Daily Israel Report

Bin Laden Planned Attacks Inside Pakistan

As the United States attempts to reset its tattered relations with Pakistan, the CIA decided to share a horde of Bin Laden's secrets
By Gabe Kahn
First Publish: 4/27/2012, 3:45 PM

Bin Laden's Abbottobad Compound
Bin Laden's Abbottobad Compound
Reuters

On the same day that Islamabad deported the widows of late Al-Qaeda arch-terrorist Osama Bin Laden, the United States' Central Intelligence Agency released intelligence data showing he had planned "indiscriminate attacks" inside Pakistan before he was killed.

The intelligence released was culled from from documents and electronic data seized during the raid on the slain arch-terrorist's compound on 2 May 2011.

The CIA shared intelligence about possible al-Qaeda attacks inside Pakistan when officials of the two countries met to explore the way forward in resetting bilateral ties, according to media reports in Islamabad.

The information was "based on documents seized by US Navy SEALs during the raid on Osama bin Laden's compound" in the garrison town of Abbottabad in May last year an official told the Times of India.

Some details of the intelligence "revealed that before being killed in the May 2 raid, bin Laden, along with Ayman Al-Zawahiri... and other senior leaders of the terror outfit had planned to mount indiscriminate attacks on Pakistani soil," the daily reported.

The report further said there were "conflicting reports about the shared intelligence."

One unnamed participant of a meeting said CIA Deputy Director Michael Morrell had presented a dossier to Pakistani officials while another claimed the US had provided "just a tip about what al-Qaida had been planning to do in Pakistan" without related details that could help them put the pieces together.

The report said it was not clear whether the CIA intended to identify bin Laden's "support network within Pakistan with the help of shared intelligence or wanted to rebuild the much-needed mutual trust for moving forward."

Relations between Washington and Islamabad have been at a nadir since the raid that killed Bin Laden, which led to significant embarrassment for officials in Pakistan.