Daily Israel Report

Purim Story in Video, in Memory of Udi Fogel

An animated video on the story of Purim is called "The Good, The Bad & the Ugly" and was produced in memory of terror victim Udi Fogel.
By Tzvi Ben Gedalyahu
First Publish: 3/4/2012, 10:50 PM

An animated video on the story of Purim is called "The Good, The Bad & the Ugly" and was produced in memory of terror victim Rabbi Ehud (Udi) Fogel, who was murdered, along with his wife and three of their six young children, by Arab terrorists last year.

The commentary is based on traditional Jewish sources and an essay written by the Rabbi Jonathan Blass on: "Pluralism, Ant-Semitism, and Man's Strive to Divinity.”

The brutal murder by two teenage terrorists shocked the world and has led over to many initiatives to commemorate the family. Last week, a new Torah study hall was commemorated in their name at the Samaria community of Itamar.

“The murder struck me hard,” says Rabbi Blass's son Shlomo, who was a good friend of Udi Fogel. “Although over the years my class has scattered to different places and our meetings became haphazard, the sense of friendship based on shared childhood memories and experiences has remained strong."

“I know that many people have done good things in memory of Udi and his family. Some big, some small, some well-known and the vast majority, not.

“I looked for something to do that was in my field. Udi was an educator who always worked out of a sense of love and belonging to the Jewish collective. He served as an officer in a combat unit in his regular service as well as in the reserves.

“In the clip I tried to take a Torah subject and make it accessible to the general public in a light-hearted way that does not impinge upon the meaning. I had help from a talented animator and illustrator, Ofer Winter.

"My decision to use Purim was not just because the holiday falls close to the date of the murder but because the main message of Purim is 'Nahafoch’hu.'  That means that it is God who is running the world, even at times when everything looks black. The wisdom, of course, is not just to know that but also to live it. To me, Udi embodied that powerfully, with a smile and a natural humility.”