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Israel's National Water Company Coming to America

Israel's National Water Company, Mekorot, will soon be setting up shop in the United States.
By Chana Ya'ar
First Publish: 2/27/2012, 5:45 PM

Mekorot worker fixes pipe
Mekorot worker fixes pipe
Flash 90

Israel's National Water Company will soon be setting up shop in the United States.

Mekorot last week signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the city of Akron, Ohio to bring and commercialize its WaTech program to the U.S. through Akron's Global Business Accelerator.

The agreement culminated a relationship that has been developing since 2010, when the city sent a professional delegation to Israel to explore areas for joint venture, technical and professional exchanges.

WaTech, the Entrepreneurship and Partnership Center for Water Technologies Program, will receive dedicated office space in Akron as its initial U.S. business development location as part of the deal.

The company's focus will be on innovations in water system security, treatment and distribution and waste water collection, and expanded energy sources.

The agreement makes Akron the first American city to secure an agreement with WaTech portfolio companies to assist in water system security, research and development, infrastructure development, joint commercialization and the promotion of international cooperation.

Mekorot and Akron will collaborate on the promotion of economic and business development initiatives, said Akron Mayor Don Plusquellic, who emphasized the mutual exchange of information that would result from the agreement. He noted that his recent trip to Israel, where he met with officials at the Ministry of National Infrastructures, had been fruitful in many other ways as well.

“Not only did we come back with a deal with Mekorot WaTech, but we also were introduced to other energy related businesses who are now interested in introducing their technologies to the United States, specifically to Akron,” he added. “To say that this trip was successful would be a major understatement.”