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      Video: Storm Brings Water to Jerusalem Area

      The weekend's winter storm didn't bring snow to Jerusalem, but it did it bring it lots of much-needed rain water.
      By Elad Benari & Hezki Ezra
      First Publish: 2/20/2012, 5:16 AM

      The winter storm which hit Israel this weekend may have left Jerusalemites a bit disappointed by the fact that there was no snow in the city, but the storm did bring with it blessed rains which resulted in a heavy flow of water in Nahal Sorek. The water flow filled the Beit Zayit dam at the entrance to Jerusalem.

      Efraim Shabtai, a supervisor at the HaGihon Firm in Jerusalem, welcomed the heavy rains and told Arutz Sheva, “We expect more. Thank G-d, this too is good. Thanks to our prayers.”

      He called on the people of Israel to keep on praying for rain. “The water is still not enough, we need much more. We need another two meters.”

      Shabtai estimated that in order to reach the required water level, another month and a half of rain at a level similar to that of the rain which fell in this weekend’s storm would be needed.

      The storm did bring snow to the northern Golan Heights, flooded Dead Sea roads, and has blessed the country with much-needed rain.

      Snow began to fall in Kiryat Arba-Hevron early Sunday morning, and schools were also closed there as the four-day storm continues to drench the country with rain and snow.

      More than four inches of rain have fallen in some northern areas, and the Kinneret rose by 16 centimeters – more than six inches – on the Sabbath.

      The heavy snow in the Golan Heights and the lower slopes of the Hermon will prompt a run-off that will help the lake rise dramatically in the coming weeks and relieve Israel's severe water shortage. Even without another major storm – and more rain is forecast before next week – the lake probably will lack less than three meters to its optimum level before the end of winter, the highest level it has reached in years.



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