Daily Israel Report

Chief Rabbi Amar: 'I Will Pray for Migron'

Israel Sephardic Chief Rabbi Shlomo Amar visits the threatened Samaria Jewish village of Migron and vows to pray for its survival.
By Chana Ya'ar
First Publish: 12/14/2011, 6:33 PM

Migron
Migron
Avi Shimshi

Israel Sephardic Chief Rabbi Shlomo Amar visited the threatened Samaria Jewish community of Migron Wednesday, and said he will pray for its survival. 

The Chief Rabbi stated that it is "well known that residents of the community are law-abiding people with public responsibility." He added, "I will pray with all my heart and will do anything to cancel this evil decree for the community to be destroyed."

Former Sephardic Chief Rabbi and Shas party spiritual leader Rabbi Ovadia Yosef has also called on Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu and Interior Minister Eli Yishai not to lift a hand against the Binyamin region community, which has been hit by a number of demolitions in recent months.

Migron is one of a number of communities slated for destruction by the government under a ruling by the Supreme Court that has mandated all land not specifically designated as State Land be considered as "private [Palestinian] land" by default, rather than unowned land.

Under the ruling rendered on September 12, 2011, the State was given 60 days to provide a schedule for destroying all Jewish building on the aforementioned "private land", with the exception of the home of an IDF officer who fell in battle with Hamas terrorists in March 2010.

However, Palestinian Authority Arabs who claimed ownership of the land upon which the community is built have since withdrawn their lawsuit for damages, because they were unable to present proof of that ownership.

It was the above-mentioned lawsuit that led in the first place to a High Court decision to raze the Jewish homes built on the land, egged on by the extreme leftist Peace Now organization.

An alternative solution involving monetary compensation had also been formulated that would have eliminated the need for demolition of the community, but it was not clear whether the government was willing to agree to exercise the option.