Daily Israel Report

Italian Anti-Semitism Committee Approves Final Report

An Italian Committee for the Inquiry into Anti-Semitism approves its final report, will present it to the public next week.
By Elad Benari, Canada
First Publish: 10/12/2011, 10:52 PM

Fiamma Nirenstein
Fiamma Nirenstein
Fiamma Nirenstein

An Italian Committee for the Inquiry into Anti-Semitism has approved its final report and will be publicly presenting it on Monday.

The committee is chaired by Jewish Italian MP Fiamma Nirenstein, who is also vice-president of the Italian Committee on Foreign Affairs.

“I am pleased to announce that, after two years of works, the Committee for the Inquiry into Anti-Semitism of the Italian Chamber of Deputies that I have the honor to chair, has approved unanimously its Final Report, that will be presented to the public and the press on Monday October 17,” Nirenstein said in a statement on Wednesday.

The Committee was instituted in December 2009 by the President of the Chamber of Deputies and is formed by 26 Italian MPs from all the political parties.

Nirenstein said that the Committee’s report is the result of an accurate elaboration of data and studies collected during dozens of hearings. The report, she said is “an alarming and innovative document compared to the existing literature on the subject. We believe it can be a landmark and an inspiration especially for our youngsters.”

The data examined by the Committee highlight the worldwide escalation worldwide of anti-Semitism and examine its several faces. According to the polls, 44% of Italians declare “not to feel sympathy” toward the Jews. The report also analyzes the new and widespread phenomenon of online anti-Semitism, which is believed to be responsible for the 22% of Italian youngsters who have a diverse hostile attitude toward the Jews.

Last year, Italy’s Committee on Foreign Affairs unanimously approved a resolution that aims to counteract the spread of anti-Semitism through the Internet.

The Committee’s report condemns the new anti-Semitism and also examines the phenomenon of Holocaust denial. The report selects several cultural and legislative aims to be adopted in order to actively contrast what historian Robert Wistrich has defined as “the longest hatred,” Nirenstein said.

The final report will be presented to the public and the press on Monday October 17 at the Italian Parliament.

(Arutz Sheva’s North American Desk is keeping you updated until the start of Sukkot in New York. The time posted automatically on all Arutz Sheva articles, however, is Israeli time.)