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A Tale of Two Evictions: Police in Migron vs. Tel Aviv

Israeli journalists challenged to look long and hard at photos showing how differently cops treated Tel Aviv squatters, Migron residents.
By Gil Ronen
First Publish: 9/7/2011, 8:03 PM

Migron and Tel Aviv
Migron and Tel Aviv
Residents' councils

The heads of the grassroots Residents' Councils of Samaria and Binyamin sent two photographs to news editors Wednesday, in the hope of making them understand how biased the establishment in Israel is toward the Jews of Judea and Samaria.

Itzik Shadmi, who heads the Binyamin group, and Benny Katzover, who heads its counterpart to the north, sent the editors a photograph showing police bringing flowers to the protesters who have camped out illegally in Tel Aviv's Rothschild Avenue all summer long, as part of the "housing protest."

The second photograph shows the brutal treatment of residents of Migron, whose eviction was ordered by the High Court.

Regarding the housing protests, the two leaders wrote:

"They put up illegal tents nationwide, blocked Tel Aviv's main avenue, disturbed the peace of the neighbors, invaded buildings in Tel Aviv, invaded buildings in Jerusalem. They were evicted with police who bore flowers. But they are the secular left wing that wants social justice; they are the press's favorite sons."

As for Migron, wrote Shadmi and Katzover:

"They were three families with children and babies who went to settle the Land of Israel on barren ground, at the behest of all of Israel's governments in the past decade. They built homes with their own money and held on to land that no one claimed ownership of. They were evicted in the dead of the night with their children, as bulldozers destroyed the homes they built with great toil. But there are despised settlers and thus it is good that they were evicted. It is good that their homes were razed and it is wonderful to see their children without a roof over their heads."  

Shadmi and Katzover asked the news desks to consider the matter and deal with it "with honesty and courage."



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