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Israeli Attitude Towards Attacks: 'No Need to Panic'

When Israel's skies are raining rockets, its airwaves are broadcasting bravery to listeners facing the fire.
By Chana Ya'ar
First Publish: 8/22/2011, 9:59 PM

Grad missile damage
Grad missile damage
HLJ

While Israel's skies are still raining rockets despite an alleged "ceasefire" local radio announcers are broadcasting bravery to bolster its citizens who are facing the fire.

After days in which mortar shells and missiles of all ranges have been fired at southern Israel, local radio announcers have been reviewing the defense instructions of Home Front Command – and stressing the importance of following them to the letter. 

“When one hears the air raid siren, one must immediately proceed directly to a safe space,” a radio announcer quietly reminded his listeners in a calm voice during a recent broadcast on the popular local southern radio station, Radio Darom.

“One does not need to run, nor does one need to panic. There is a full minute's travel time for the missile to reach Be'er Sheva from Gaza, 60 seconds, in which to find shelter – more than enough time,” he said soothingly, “so don't run. Just don't dawdle. If you are traveling in a car, park and leave the car. Knock on the nearest door or enter the nearest shelter.

“I am sure that anyone with a shelter will share their safe space with you in such times,” he added in a comforting tone. The announcer also reminded listeners not to leave the shelter for at least 10 minutes after impact is heard in order to be sure there is no secondary attack.

That last bit of information was especially important; Police Commissioner Yochanan Danino commented to reporters regretfully at one missile impact site last Friday, “This could have been prevented – this event could have ended with no casualties.”

He called on residents to stay indoors and avoid gathering in public places, even though many have expressed real curiosity about the Iron Dome anti-missile system and the desire to watch it in action.

“I know that the Iron Dome looks like fireworks (when it operates) and it draws people out on the streets,” Danino said, “but we must put a stop to it. We need to put our curiosity aside,” he appealed.

Even though the Hamas terrorist rulers of Gaza allegedly initiated a ceasefire late Sunday night, the so-called truce had already been violated more than a dozen times within its first 24 hours. It was also unclear how many of Gaza's numerous terrorist organizations have actually signed on to cooperate with the agreement.