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Rabbi's Response to Dawkins: G-d Plays Dice

Rabbi Michael Avraham takes on the topic of G-d, atheism and evolution in his new book, “G-d Plays Dice.”
By Maayana Miskin
First Publish: 6/3/2011, 9:49 AM / Last Update: 6/3/2011, 2:12 PM

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Can evolution and religious faith coexist? Are those who believe in G-d destined to forever reject scientific findings? Does accepting neo-Darwinism mean becoming an atheist?

Rabbi Michael Avraham tackles all these subjects and more in his new book Elo-him M'Sachek B'Kubiyot (G-d Plays Dice), in which he addresses the arguments made by proponents and opponents of various theories of evolution and religion. The book was written, in part, as a response to Richard Dawkins' book The G-d Delusion, which criticizes religion and promotes atheism.

“It seems that we will not always be forced to choose between two terrible options: being ignorant believers, or educated atheists,” Rabbi Avraham's publisher said of the book.

In an interview with Arutz Sheva's Hebrew-language news service, Rabbi Avraham explained that he had two goals in writing his book: to clarify the debate between neo-Darwinism and religion, and to show that the questions of G-d's existence and the truth of the Bible are separate from the issue of evolution.

Both neo-Darwinism and theories that reject evolution are based in logic, but take their arguments to the wrong conclusions, Rabbi Avraham believes. Neither side is truly listening to the other, he said, adding, “People are fighting, more than they are debating.”

While the many arguments in the book could not be conveyed in a brief interview, Rabbi Avraham did reveal that ultimately, he believes that scientific findings support the theory of evolution – and that evolution actually strengthens the philosophical arguments on behalf of G-d's existence.

In addition to being a rabbi and a former Rosh Yeshiva, Rabbi Avraham is a theoretical physicist who spent several years conducting research at Bar Ilan University and the Weitzmann Institute. He currently works as a professor at several institutions of higher education, including Betzalel and the Hebrew University law department.