Daily Israel Report

YouTube Bans PA-Watchdog Group, Cites 'Hate Speech'

The popular YouTube site has shut down the Palestinian Media Watch account due to the venom shown on PA videos the watchdog group exposes.
By Chana Ya'ar
First Publish: 12/19/2010, 3:43 PM / Last Update: 12/19/2010, 4:36 PM

Video-sharing website YouTube shut down on Sunday the main account of the Palestinian Media Watch for posting the PA’s publicly-broadcast programs to the site, where others can see and become aware of the truth about them. PMW translates the Arabic broadcasts into English so that the truth about PA incitement can be publicized.

YouTube was recently purchased by the giant Google Internet search engine company.

The following video, titled "Hamas TV teaches kids to kill Jews", was one of the videos removed from YouTube for "violating Terms of Use".

The reason given by YouTube for shutting down PMW’s main video account, PALWATCH, was that it had “violated YouTube terms of use” by propagating hate speech.

The account was terminated “due to repeated or severe violations of our Terms of Use,” with specific examples of videos listed -- all of which were re-broadcast from official Palestinian Authority government sources:


1. "Hamas TV teaches kids to kill Jews" removed on 10/02/2009
2. "Jews are a virus like Aids" removed on 01/18/2010.
3. "Farewell video before suicide attack of Hamas suicide bomber Adham Ahmad Hujyla Abu Jandal" removed on 06/10/2010.
4. "Hamas suicide farewell video: Jews monkeys and pigs; Maidens reward for killing Jews" removed on 08/14/2010.
5. "PA cleric: Kill Jews, Allah will make Muslims masters over Jews" removed on 12/12/2010.
6. "Hamas suicide terrorist farewell video: Palestinians drink the blood of Jews" removed on 12/15/2010.

The following image now comes up when one clicks on the links that used to reach these videos, which have been viewed hundreds of thousands of times:

PMW has asked that viewers appeal to YouTube to reopen the account, because the exposure is essential to the organization's work. “If any of our subscribers can help, it would be much appreciated,” founder Itamar Marcus said in a statement.