Katyushas Found in S. Lebanon Ready to Launch at Israel

Lebanese Army sappers were called to defuse seven Katyusha rockets that were discovered on Thursday in southern Lebanon. All were aimed at Israel.

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Hana Levi Julian,

Hizbullah terrorist prepares Katyusha missile
Hizbullah terrorist prepares Katyusha missile
Israel News Photo: (archive)

Seven Katyusha rockets were discovered in southern Lebanon Thursday less than five kilometers, or three miles from Israel's northern border, primed and ready to fire.


Report on Katyushas on Lebanon TV station.

Lebanese Army sappers were called to defuse the missiles, according to the Lebanese Naharnet news website, which quoted a "reliable source".

The 107-mm missiles, which were fitted with timing devices, were deployed in the Naqoura region, across the border from the central and western Galilee regions, and were set up to be launched at Israel. The source, which spoke on condition of anonymity, said the Katyushas were found in the area between the border towns of Naqoura and Teir Harfa, "a short while before the time set for their launching."

No details were made available as to which specific type of Katyusha missile was discovered. There are several different versions; during the 2006 Second Lebanon War, the Hizbullah terrorist group used Iranian-modified RAADD Katyushas equipped with warheads carrying 100 kilograms (220 lb) of explosives.

The area in which the missiles were found is supposed to be under the control of the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL), but is considered a Hizbullah stonghold. According to the terms of ceasefire agreement set forth in the U.N. Security Council Resolution 1701, the presence of the force was established specifically to prevent such an occurrence.

Hamas terrorists in Gaza began launching medium-range Grad-type Katyusha rockets at the port city of Ashkelon more than a year ago, after receiving advanced munitions and guerrilla training from the Iranian-backed Hizbullah guerillas. One of those missiles was launched at Ashkelon Thursday evening.