'Jerusalem Day' in Iran

Iran and Hamas celebrated their version of Jerusalem Day by mocking the Holocaust and urging suicide attacks. McCain warned of a second Holocaust.

Tzvi Ben Gedalyahu,

Holocaust subject of mockery in Iran
Holocaust subject of mockery in Iran
Flash 90


Marching Muslims burnt Israeli and American flags in celebration of the book's release.
Tens of thousands of Muslims in Iran and Gaza celebrated their version of Jerusalem Day on Friday with a mockery of the Holocaust and a call for suicide bombings to facilitate the "death of Israel." Former Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini initiated the "Quds Day" celebration after the 1979 revolution establishing the Islamic Republic.

 

Iranian Muslim students at the Palestine Square in Tehran unveiled a book mocking the Holocaust, with its cover depicting a Jew with a crooked nose while drawing the outline of dead bodies. The book depicts Jews leaving the Nazi gas chambers with a counter that records "5,999,999," one less than the round figure of six million Jews who were Nazi terror victims.

 

One picture shows Jews entering a Nazi extermination furnace and leaving as terrorists who are toting guns. Marching Muslims burnt Israeli and American flags in celebration of the book's release.

 

In Gaza, Hamas legislator Ahmed Abu Helbiya called on Arabs "to contain the enemy and halt its [Israel's] aggression by planning martyrdom operations." He praised the February murder of eight yeshiva students in Jerusalem, the bulldozer attack in the capital that killed three more Jews and this week's attempted murder of Israeli soldiers by an Arab driver from Jerusalem.

 

Meanwhile, Iran was one of the subjects in a debate between United States presidential candidates Senators Barack Obama and John McCain. The Republican nominee warned that a nuclear Iran would result in the threat of a "second Holocaust."

 

He backed stronger sanctions against Iran. Sen. Obama agreed but added, "We also have to engage in tough direct diplomacy with Iran" and reasoned that not talking to Tehran is tantamount to "punishing them."

 

However, the Democratic senator admitted that Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad "may not be the right person to talk to" because he "is not the most powerful person in Iran."

 

McCain replied, "Let me get this right. We sit down with Ahmadinejad and he says, 'we're going to wipe Israel off the face of the earth,' and we say, 'no, you're not?' Please."



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