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Court Rules: Yigal Amir's Son Will be Circumcised in Prison

A Tel Aviv District Court has ruled that Amir may not leave prison for his son's brit this Sunday, and that it should be held in prison instead.
By Hillel Fendel
First Publish: 11/2/2007, 11:54 AM

A Tel Aviv District Court has ruled that Yigal Amir may not leave prison for his son's brit this Sunday, and that it should be held in his presence in prison instead. A private citizen later filed suit against the decision.

At the end of a stormy court session on Thursday, Judge Tzvi Gorfinkel stated he could not find a reason to prevent the brit (ritual circumcision) of the baby son of Yigal Amir and his wife Larissa Trimbobler from being held in jail.  "The fact that a brit has never been held in prison before is only because all other convicts are allowed to attend their son's brit in other places," the judge stated.

Yigal Amir is serving a life sentence without parole for the assassination of Prime Minister Yitzchak Rabin.  The murder occurred on Nov. 4, 1995 - exactly 12 years before the scheduled date of the brit.  By Jewish law, a baby boy must be circumcised on the eighth day after birth; if not, he must be circumcised on the earliest date thereafter.  The baby is also named at the brit ceremony.

If Amir Can't Go to Brit, Bring Brit to Amir
Judge Gorinkel turned down Amir's request to be allowed to leave prison for the circumcision ceremony, but accepted his alternative suggestion to have it in the prison.  The judge rebuked the Prosecution, saying, "I don't understand why it can't be held in prison.  What's the problem with having it with just a small amount of family members? He's permitted to have visits from the baby and his family, so why can't it just be turned into a brit?"

The Prosecution had claimed that allowing Amir out of prison "would cause a public storm and unrest amidst the public.  Planning for such an event would be nearly impossible."  During the court session, the Prosecution recommended that the brit be held outside the prison, but that Amir be permitted to watch it over closed circuit television.  The judge turned down this idea as well. 

Amir's legal counsel, Atty. Shmuel Caspar, said he regretted the coincidental timing of the brit and the anniversary of the assassination, but "this was caused by the fact that the Prison Service prevented Amir's wife from becoming pregnant for two years."

Private Suit
Not unexpectedly, an urgent suit has already been filed against holding the brit in prison.  Rabin-admirer Rani Rahav demands that his appeal be heard immediately, before it becomes irrelevant.  Rahav claims that Amir is different than all other murderers, and that he should be granted no privileges or benefits.  "The decision [to allow the brit in jail] has no justice, no logic, no rhyme nor reason, and should be withdrawn immediately," Rahav's lawyer said.