Daily Israel Report

Ex-MK Bishara Openly Backs Hizbullah in Lebanon

Israeli-Arab ex-MK Bishara spoke out in favor of Hizbullah while on a tour in Lebanon hosted by the terror group.
By Ezra HaLevi
First Publish: 8/26/2007, 3:18 PM

Israeli-Arab ex-MK Azmi Bishara, on the run from Israel after being investigated for spying on behalf of Hizbullah, is in Lebanon, hosted by the terror group. Until now, Bishara denied that he passed information to Hizbullah terrorists during the Second Lebanon War. The Arab leader retains his Israeli citizenship and has now openly taken a stand on behalf of Hizbullah.
 
Bishara addressed the media while touring Hizbullah's headquarters in southern Lebanon, hosted by the group's media division. He announced that he would be spearheading an international effort to bring the war criminals - Israel and America - to justice.
 
The disgraced Knesset Member laid wreaths in Bint Jbeil, a town that witnessed heavy fighting between IDF soldiers and Hizbullah terrorists. He also visited Kfar Qana and called the Israeli air strikes there the worst massacre since Israel's establishment. He added that it proved that the "long-awaited agreement with the Zionist entity is an impossibility… The massacres that were carried out were not a coincidence but were a strategic policy to frighten people."
 
On Friday, Bishara gave a speech praising Hizbullah and saying the group is now stronger than ever before. "Everybody envies the Lebanese for their [Hizbullah] resistance and its leadership [Sheikh Hassan Nasrallah]," Bishara was quoted by Lebanese TV as saying. "But I envy the resistance for its people… Hizbullah has rearmed itself in the last year and perhaps is now stronger than ever… I am convinced that Israel has become incapable of attacking Lebanon again, and that is a very big achievement for the resistance."

Bishara's statements were not denounced by any of his former Israeli-Arab MK colleagues.

Israeli-Arab Terrorism on the Rise
Israeli Arab involvement in terrorism more than tripled in the first three years following the 2000 Oslo War. There were eight incidents in 2000, 25 in 2001 and 19 in the first five months of 2002.  Hundreds of Israel's Arab citizens have since been nabbed for involvement in anti-Jewish terrorist activity, but the Shabak has refrained from publishing additional statistics on the phenomenon.

Just this past week, the head of the “Bnei Hakfar” Israeli-Arab movement, Rajed Iabirah of Um El-Fahm, threatened to carry out terror attacks against Israeli Jews. Iabireh is an Israeli citizen, and Um El-Fahm is within the pre-1967 borders of the country.

Iabireh said that Israeli-Arabs were very frustrated over a number of issues relating to Israeli control over Judea and Samaria – and especially Jerusalem. “The Israeli establishment always takes the wrong course,” he said in an interview with a local Arabic-language publication. “We are doing them a great favor by restricting our activities to political protests at this time. But they should not err: We have sacrificed martyrs in the past, and we will do so again in the future." He did not specify what he meant by “martyr's sacrifice.”

The IDF Senior Command is reportedly preparing for the possibility of a full-on rebellion by Israel's Arabs against the state's Jewish citizens as part of a future war scenario.