Should We Be Happy, or Should We Be Sad?

Tzvi Fishman,

לבן ריק
לבן ריק
צילום: ערוץ 7
Tzvi Fishman
Tzvi Fishman is a recipient of the Israel Ministry of Education Award for Creativity and Jewish Culture. His many novels and books on a variety of Jewish themes are available at Amazon Books. Recently, he has published "Arise and Shine!" and "The Lion's Roar" - 2 sequels to his popular novel, "Tevye in the Promised Land." In Israel, the Tevye trilogy is distributed by Sifriyat Bet-El Publishing. He is also the director and producer of the feature film, "Stories of Rebbe Nachman," starring Israel's popular actor, Yehuda Barkan. www.tzvifishmanbooks.com ...

SHOULD WE BE HAPPY, OR SHOULD WE BE SAD?

Dateline Jerusalem - Wednesday, June 3, 2020

Image may contain: Tzvi Fishman, smiling

“The Jewish Agency estimates that in the coming year, approximately 50,000 people will immigrate to Israel, almost twice the average, following the coronavirus crisis, morbidity, and the collapse of many Jewish communities.”

Once upon a time, I worked at the Aliyah Department of the Jewish Agency, and at least, back then, we inflated numbers to make it sound as if we were actually doing something. But let’s say that the estimate is accurate. To make the mathematics simple, figure that there are 14 million Jews in the world, blee ayin hara. If 6 million of them are in Israel, then 8 million are still clinging passionately to Gentile lands. 50,000 new olim out of 8 million is .625 percent. That means less than one percent of the total number of Jews in the Diaspora may be on their way to Israel, on the heels of the “coronavirus crisis, morbidity (an elegant way of saying death), and the collapse of many Jewish communities” – not to mention the ongoing riots and increasing anti-Semitism. Less than one percent!

The Jewish Agency announcement says that 25,000 would have come anyway, like they came last year, without all of the rioting and Corona balagan. That means that 25,000 have been inspired to move to the Promised Land because of big trouble in Moscow, Paris, London, Madrid, Mexico City, and Brooklyn. 25,000 is .3125 percent of the overall Jews in the world, a third of one percent.

Dear friends, if a hospital had a patient survival rate of .3125 percent, or even .625% to take the larger number, its doors would be closed. If a basketball coach had a .625% winning record, he would be fired. What’s the conclusion? The combined budget of the Jewish Agency, the Israel Ministry of Aliyah and Klita, and the Ministry of Diaspora Affairs, is over 3 billion shekels. Should we be happy, or should we be sad?