The Dispersal Plan

With all these connections with Gaza's Arabs, you can hardly call the plan a "disengagement". So, where does the disengagement apply?

Aliza Karp,

On the 8th of Tishrei, October 11, Hillel Fendel reported on Arutz Sheva, "Thirty families from the former Gush Katif community of Gadid who have long demanded to remain together have now been told that they are to be scattered in different directions."

Ariel Sharon and the Knesset called their plan the Disengagement Plan. But close scrutiny - as brought to public awareness by the determined efforts of David Bedein and his Israel Resource News Agency - reveals that there is in fact no disengagement. Jews are still supplying Gaza with water, electricity, industrial zones, markets, employment and - if I read the news correctly - we are still supplying ammunition!

With all these connections with Gaza's Arabs, you can hardly call the plan a "disengagement". So, where does the disengagement apply?

The disengagement refers to the breaking of relations between the Jews of Gaza and the northern Shomron and the Jewish state. The Knesset passed the Disengagement Plan and so did the Cabinet. The army implemented the decree. In the aftermath of the destruction of industrious, productive, moral communities, the state hides its face and shirks it responsibility to those who are left stranded. The state has disengaged from loyal citizens. The world knows it. The general media consistently reported the "Israeli army" evacuating "Jewish settlers".

The politicians who voted for the Disengagement Plan are not so naive as to think the extrication of Jews from their homes will transform terrorists into peace-loving flower children. But they do know it has dispersed the strong, wholesome, religious communities that flourished in Eretz Yisroel.

At the beginning of Shmos, of the second book of the Five Books of Moses, we are told that a new Pharaoh became the ruler of Egypt. Rashi says that this was not an actual new person; it was the same person with a new and very different policy. It was the same Pharaoh who gladly settled Yosef's family in Goshen. But as the years went by, he saw how strong the Hebrews were becoming. He feared their strength and set out to weaken them physically and psychologically.

I don't like to say that Sharon is acting like Pharoah, but the parallel is just too real. Ariel Sharon was once the advocate for settling the land. And we did settle the land and the settlers became very strong. They have incredible family values, they have solid community relationships, they have a strong bond with the land, and at the same time, they have developed a close connection to the G-d of Israel.

Sharon did not foresee the fruits that would grow from the seedling settlements. He settled handfuls of idealists on rocky hilltops and barren sand dunes, but he did not know they would evolve into such strong tribes, so strong they became known for providing the armed forces with the finest, most dedicated, most skilled soldiers, or that they would bring to the country much needed cash from their export industries. The potent Judea, Samaria and Gaza communities are not what Sharon and the secular Zionists had in mind.

The secular Zionists have their own vision of the state. Traditional Jewish values are to be the side-dish of their state, not the main course.

So, like Pharaoh, Sharon had to think of a plan to weaken the settlers. He saw the strength in their communities and decided his tactic would be dispersal, and he would call it Disengagement. Sharon is a man of war. To conquer is second nature to him. In this case, he has chosen to divide and conquer. The Disengagement Plan is actually a Dispersal Plan.

As quoted above, "The former Gush Katif community of Gadid who have long demanded to remain together have now been told that they are to be scattered in different directions." And I will add that the former Gush Katif community of Gadid in not the only former Gush Katif community to be scattered in different directions.

In a recently publicized letter written to Mrs. Geula Cohen in the year 5741 (1981), the Lubavitcher Rebbe writes about the Jewish government, "I have seen that it is all in one direction: concessions and withdrawal, etc...."

Even with this perspective, and his foresight that the settlements would not endure, still the Rebbe did not remain silent. He steadfastly protested and fought to topple any government that even spoke about concessions.

Covering up and rationalizing the evil of the Dispersal Plan will only lead to inaction. Delving into the heartbreaking facts of how Jews are treating Jews is painful, but we have to know the enemy in order to fight him. From the chaos of the Dispersal Plan has come the clarity of what a Jewish government is actually capable of doing.

The dispersal is only one aspect. In the process, we witnessed the infringements on freedom of movement, freedom of speech and infringements on democracy itself. When we say we will not forgive and not forget, we have to keep in mind the religious parties who stayed in the government, preventing its downfall, while saying they were going to change things from the inside. In fact, they had no potential to change anything. And, of course, we cannot forget those who joined the government to keep it in power.

Don't let your orange flag get dusty - the struggle is not over.


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