I Would Be Ashamed to Live in Madison

Nine months ago, I participated in an anti-terrorism conference in Israel, where I live. One of the representatives at the conference was the governor of Oklahoma, who came to show his solidarity with Israel and its continuing fight against Palestinian terrorism. His moving speech came as a finale to the conference. By coincidence, his speech also occurred on one of terrorism's biggest days; who w

Angela Bertz

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Nine months ago, I participated in an anti-terrorism conference in Israel, where I live. One of the representatives at the conference was the governor of Oklahoma, who came to show his solidarity with Israel and its continuing fight against Palestinian terrorism. His moving speech came as a finale to the conference. By coincidence, his speech also occurred on one of terrorism's biggest days; who will ever forget the date September 9th?

I would like to take this opportunity to share with the people of Madison, Wisconsin - who will yet decide if they will twin their city with Gaza's Rafah - two events that took place on that particular day, not in New York, but in Israel.

It was especially stressful for me that day, as the governor's speech came about two hours after a deranged Palestinian had leapt out of a car at an army base bus stop. This creature then threw himself into the crowd and detonated a bomb, killing nine soldiers and wounding 30 more, some of them critically.

I have a child who had been at that same bus stop an hour earlier.

Maybe the people of Madison, who have never had to come face to face with the painful realities of Palestinian terrorism can afford to be just a little flippant about it. Maybe you are simply blissfully unaware of what it feels like to be gripped with such strangulated fear that you can hardly breath and your whole body feels like one big spasm. Unfortunately for nine parents, this fear turned into reality, as they buried their children the next day. They will live the rest of their lives never knowing another day of peace in their hearts.

The governor's speech also came about two hours before another deranged Palestinian detonated a bomb in a cafe in Jerusalem, killing seven and wounding 50 more.

Later that evening, the denizens of Gaza took to the streets to celebrate these barbaric acts of terrorism. Hooded thugs paraded in the streets firing rifles in the air, a mother proudly whooped tears of joy with a $10,000 check in her hand, and children gathered candy thrown to them by jubilant shop-keepers.

So, Ms. Jennifer Lowenstein of Madison, when you say that Rafah is a microcosm of what is happening in all Palestinian cities, I heartily agree with you.

When Palestinians succeed in blowing up innocent Israelis in restaurants or buses, their city streets throng with the same sort of demonic people who pour onto the streets of Gaza, sometimes even setting off fireworks to add to the carnival atmosphere. Many of these cities go even further than that. They actually name streets, or, for the very lucky few, a whole square after these murderers. They are held up as pillars of the community to thousands of Palestinian schoolchildren, who have been systematically brainwashed by the hate, incitement and lies their leaders spew out 24/7.

A few weeks ago, barbaric savages in Gaza were seen shrieking with cannibalistic frivolity, running through the streets with the blown up body parts of our soldiers. The soldiers had been trying to destroy tunnels used for smuggling weapons and ammunition from Egypt to Gaza. This ammunition was for the specific purpose of performing acts of murder and carnage against innocent Israelis.

I am astounded that these acts, and over 100 more homicide bombings in Israel, do not sicken you to the very core of your being. I am appalled that you would even consider associating yourselves with the sort of society that can breed people who will go up to a car driven by a pregnant woman and her four little girls and gun them down in cold blood.

I was as proud to hear the governor of Oklahoma's poignant speech as I am to live in Israel, a country where we uphold human values and rejoice in life.

I would be ashamed to live in Madison.




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