Why Chris Matthews’ firing should worry you

How quickly your friends, particularly on the Left, fade away once you’ve been triggered, no matter how supportive you’ve been for them over the years.

Jack Engelhard

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What did he do?

Inappropriate “flirting” is the accusation, such as saying to the woman, his accuser, “Why haven’t I fallen in love with you yet?”

She herself, a reporter for HuffPost, but writing about it for GQadmits that it was not…was not sexual abuse, but that the flirting was enough, or rather too much.

So she went public with it, about a moment or two that occurred some time ago in the makeup room at MSNBC’s “Hardball,” which Chris Matthews had hosted for some 20 years.

But no more. He was fired.

The lesson? As Bill Maher suggests – beware, the Cancel Culture can come for you, too. 

It was interesting to hear from Maher, since few others on the Left, none actually, rallied for Matthews, who’d been for them what Rush Limbaugh had been for the Right. So it was up to us, Right-leaning writers, namely Kyle Smith and Maureen Callahan, and now this observer, to wonder if justice was done too harshly.

The day has come when the few have gathered to defend a man whose political views we found obnoxious. But fair is fair.

Or maybe we are concerned because it might be about all of us, when we think we are being playful, but women think otherwise, that we are being creepy.

That is finally sinking in, as per Matthews himself, at his sign-off, where he remarked that “compliments over a woman’s appearance,” are not always appreciated. 


It’s only taken thousands of years for men to start figuring it out, that we are not so adorable.
Get it…got it…good. It’s only taken thousands of years for men to start figuring it out, that we are not so adorable. (But our mothers loved us!) 

Yet for a stupid comment here and there, and never actually forcing himself on a woman, Matthews’ job, his career, his legacy, his name, his fame, his reputation, his friendships, all ruined.

There is never getting any of it back, not these days, and maybe it was a quick hook. Or maybe he got what he deserved. Don’t ask me. I’m a man. We don’t know anything.

Where to go with this? Perhaps the toxic culture? Or the fine line between flattery and harassment? 

Starting with Harvey Weinstein and Matt Lauer, how did it go so wrong between men and women, and is it so, or mostly so, only in America?

Or is it our business to be critical of the Islamic world, where women are harnessed to Islamic Law? It is doubtful that women in those places write articles horrified at being flirted, when, in fact, they haven’t much to say about compulsory genital mutilation, and where clothing and moving about freely is for women to do as they are told. 

In Israel, as in most Jewish homes everywhere, it is quite the opposite; when men rule, it is at the consent of their women.

Worthy discussions, but for this moment, we focus on Matthews as an example…an example of how quickly your friends, particularly on the Left, fade away once you’ve been triggered, no matter how supportive you’ve been for them over the years. You thought you were solid. You thought you were special. You thought you were invincible. You thought you were legendary and an erstwhile untouchable member of the club.

Until you find out, not so.

You find out that you are disposable, and that every man is an island, after all.

This was a beaten man who signed off for his final hour. Good riddance, or so you would expect, since his politics were so offensive.

But we can’t help but feel for a guy who, in our view, was not brought down by politics, nor even by a direct accusation of being a serial flirt. 

No, he was defeated by friends he counted on but who were not there for him. So it is not really about him. Pity any man or woman in the same predicament.

New York-based bestselling American novelist Jack Engelhard writes regularly for Arutz Sheva.

He wrote the worldwide book-to-movie bestseller “Indecent Proposal,” and the authoritative newsroom epic, “The Bathsheba Deadline,” followed by his coming-of-age classics, “The Girls of Cincinnati,” and, the Holocaust-to-Montreal memoir, “Escape from Mount Moriah,” for which contemporaries have hailed him “The last Hemingway, a writer without peer, and the conscience of us all.” Website: www.jackengelhard.com

 










 



 





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