Politicians – a time to confess

We are not talking about the people in either of our two great countries. The people are fine. It is the politicians who need to grow up - and own up.

Jack Engelhard, | updated: 12:00

OpEds Jack Engelhard
Jack Engelhard
צילום: מתוך האתר האישי

Since we are all sinners, obviously our political leaders are no saints, either. 

They too need to rise up to confess, and there is no better time for that than during these High Holy Days when Jews are summoned to seek forgiveness.

Christians – Christian politicians – please join in. You are not so perfect, either.

No time like the present, is there, to consider our flaws and reflect on our follies. 

You say with Shakespeare something is rotten in the state of Denmark? 

Politically – thanks to those Leftists, sorry to say – it is 10 times worse in America, and better in Israel, yes, but not by much.

The sin of political pettiness is so glaring. 

Again, we are not talking about the people in either of our two great countries. The people are fine. It is the politicians who need to grow up.

So, taking the cue from Ashamnu and Al Chet (look it up), we ask our politicians first join us in prayer “for the welfare of the State,” a legacy from our Wisdom of the Fathers.

If only they’d kept that in mind, our politicians, we would not be marinating in this pickle.

Yes – above all, “the welfare of the State.” Wouldn’t that be unique.

Next, we would ask them, whether in synagogue or in church, to rise and say, “We have transgressed.”

You don’t know what this means? Yes, you do. 

Then: “We have imputed falsely.”

Yes, you have, and you have been doing it all along. 

Then: “We have given false counsel.”

You bet you have. It’s in the newspapers and on TV every day.

Then: “We have provoked.”

No doubt about that one.

Then: “We have slandered.”

Against your political opponents, and members of your own faith; up and down, every day of the week.

Then: “We have been obstinate.”

Listen to yourselves sometimes.

Then seek forgiveness…” for the sin of coercion.”

No need to explain.

Then seek forgiveness…” for the sin of deceit.”

That says plenty.

Then seek forgiveness for the sin committed by “hard-heartedness.”

That says it perfectly.

May we all merit second chances to correct our mistakes. Can I get me an Amen?

New York-based bestselling American novelist Jack Engelhard writes regularly for Arutz Sheva.

He is the author of the international book-to-movie bestseller “Indecent Proposal.” His Holocaust to Montreal memoir “Escape from Mount Moriah” has been honored from page to screen at CANNES. His Inside Journalism thriller, “The Bathsheba Deadline,” is being prepared for the movies. Contemporaries have hailed him “The last Hemingway, a writer without peer, and the conscience of us all.” Website: www.jackengelhard.com












 

 




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