Corbyn, the first openly anti-Semitic leader in post-Hitler Europe

Mr. Corbyn is already the first Western leader who questions Israel's right to exist and its legitimacy.

Giulio Meotti, | updated: 17:26

giulio meott
giulio meott
צילום: עצמי

“Jeremy Corbyn is at the doors of power. If he gets into 10 Downing Street it will be the first time in post-Hitler Europe that a great nation would be led by a leader who quite clearly has antisemitic tendencies”, the French philosopher Alain Finkielkraut just said.

A few weeks ago, British lawyer Anthony Julius said Mr Corbyn's spokesman Seumas Milne believed the main political question was “1947”, the year before Israel's foundation, implying the senior aide to the Labour leader was unduly obsessed with the Jewish state. It is in fact more than that Finkielkraut's prediction: Mr. Corbyn is already the first Western leader who questions Israel's right to exist and its legitimacy.

Always in the name of anti-Zionism, Corbyn has developed close ties with Hamas and Hezbollah, which are, it must be remembered, terrorist organizations that continue to fire rockets on the civilian population of Israel and wish to threaten its existence. Corbyn allegedly intervened to prevent the closure of the accounts of the Finsbury Park mosque, a hotbed of fiery Islamist preaching, and he refused to allow Labour to sign the charter defining anti-Semitism and signed by most European governments and government parties, on the grounds
In 2016, Labor MP Naz Shah proposed to transfer Israel to the United States. As for Ken Livingston, former Labour mayor of London, nicknamed “Ken the Red”, he declared in 2016 “that Hitler was Zionist ...”.
that the charter prohibits comparing Israel's behavior to Nazi atrocities.

The entourage of Corbyn is no less sulphurous. In 2016, Labor MP Naz Shah proposed to transfer Israel to the United States. As for Ken Livingston, former Labour mayor of London, nicknamed “Ken the Red”, he declared in 2016 “that Hitler was Zionist ...”.

A resurgence of old anti-Semitism is now painted in the colors of anti-Zionism and anticapitalism. After the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, the British far left, in opposition to the West, preferred to ally itself with the Islamist movements rather than to be reconciled with Western democracy. Anti-Semitism plays a central role in  Corbyn's rise. That is why his supporters do not seem bothered by accusations of anti-Semitism.

The new anti-Semite of our time, personified by Corbyn, proclaims itself "friend of all Muslims", from the inhabitants of the suburbs of the Western cities, the alleged victims of the racism of the malevolent Whites, to the Islamists presented as brave anti-colonial soldiers, such as the Palestinian Arabs who are instrumentalized in a manichean struggle against Israel and the Jews. T

his new anti-Semite is not ashamed, he believes himself to be morally justified. He accuses Europe's Jews of being more faithful to Israel than to their own nation; he claims that the existence of Israel as a state represents a racist endeavor that we must dismantle; he demands a higher level of ethical behavior on the part of Israel than on any other nation; he compares the Israeli government to the Nazis; he considers the Palestinian Arab cause, revised and corrected by cultural Marxism, as the spearhead of anticolonialism. But this horrific indulgence towards anti-Semitism is inseparable from an extraordinary leniency towards Islamic expansionism.

That is why, to return to Finkielkraut's prediction, if Mr. Corbyn gets into 10 Downing Street, that day will be not only mark the end of British Jewry, it will also be the end of the UK as we know it. 




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