No LeBron, we don’t all stick together

You could have used your fame as a force for fellowship, but you chose to go common.

Jack Engelhard, | updated: 07:29

OpEds Jack Engelhard
Jack Engelhard
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Speaking of money, LeBron, or rather “Jewish money,” as you have it with rapper 21 Savage, I should not have to mention two poor Jews who did more for black athletes than anyone else – ever. The one was Abe Saperstein, raised in the “poor Jewish quarter of Chicago” to go on as founder of the Harlem Globetrotters – the phenomenally successful basketball team that also, incidentally, broke color barriers along the way.

Next we’ll be hearing, all Jews are smart.

At the risk of his life, at a time when such things were not done, Saperstein singlehandedly dared to play a huge part toward integrating the game outside the NBA.

Saperstein’s all-black Globetrotters beat all those white teams, but did it with such skill and charm that hardly anyone cared about differences in race. The game was all.

I do not know how much money you are worth these days, LeBron James, plenty millions for sure as our greatest athlete, but you might consider a donation to the Saperstein family.

A thank you note to Saperstein as well as to Red Auerbach, a Russian-Jewish immigrant who steered the NBA’s Boston Celtics to incredible heights, meanwhile also breaking color barriers – yes, a thank you note to both those pioneers would have been preferable to your social media post which approves such lyrics, from rapper 21 Savage, as “We been getting that Jewish money. Everything is kosher.”

I cringe at such license.

Or next we’ll be hearing how all Jews stick together.

I’m not sure if those men knew one another, LeBron. Incredible, I know. But Jews can be terribly diverse.

If all Jews stick together, it’s news to me. If we are all rich, my father did not know about it, neither did my entire neighborhood, and I am not rolling in dough, either.

Tell you the truth, LeBron, I am probably as good a writer as you are a basketball player, but the draw picked you for wealth.

It’s called luck, as I have it here, where I say luck is everything; and it’s got nothing to do with being black or Jewish or anything, so can we please knock off the stereotyping

Half of us, at least here in the United States, are not on speaking terms with the other half – politics does that to people. But Saperstein and Auerbach must have crossed paths while they opened so many doors for deserving black athletes…and I doubt that there was anything Jewish that brought them together – rather it was the joy of success for themselves and their teams.

They got rich. So did everybody else in the huddle. Is that a problem? I suppose this, that when athletes ask for more money, it’s good business; for Jews, it means they’re greedy.

You could have used your fame as a force for fellowship, but you chose to go common.

Your apology, LeBron, amounts to salt on the wound – which has you saying, “I thought it was a compliment.”

Please, don’t even try. We may not be as smart as you think we are, but we are not stupid, either. We know what’s going on.


Jews are expected to take it and feel no pain and I assure you, LeBron, it hurts, hurts plenty, whether coming from Louis Farrakhan or from an LA Lakers superstar.
Funny what these rappers get away with, though. No political correctness for them; no one is asking for an apology from 21 Savage.

Anything goes if it’s against another group, like mine – is that the deal?

Say anything that hints at racism against African Americans (of which we emphatically do not approve) and entire careers go down the drain. Apologies are never good enough.  

Your apology settled the matter in your favor, the league will take no action, so down goes another stereotype, that Jews get all the breaks.

But Jews are expected to take it and feel no pain and I assure you, LeBron, it hurts, hurts plenty, whether coming from Louis Farrakhan or from an LA Lakers superstar.

Jews asked for no favors after marching with MLK. But neither did we ask for this.

Too bad watching your genius on the court will never be the same. Not for me.

New York-based bestselling American novelist Jack Engelhard writes regularly for Arutz Sheva.

He is the author of the international book-to-movie bestseller “Indecent Proposal,” the classic Inside Journalism thriller, “The Bathsheba Deadline,” and most recently “News Anchor Sweetheart.” Contemporaries have hailed him “The last Hemingway, a writer without peer, and the conscience of us all.” Engelhard is the recipient of the Ben Hecht Award for Literary Excellence. Website: www.jackengelhard.com




 




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