(IsraelNN.com) Huge crowds turned out Monday in Bnei Brak for the funeral procession of Rabbi Aryeh Leibish Halberstam, the grand rebbe of the Sanz hassidic sect, who was buried in Jerusalem after dying at Netanya's Laniado Hospital on Sunday. He was 94.



The Sanz hasidic dynasty was founded by Rabbi Chaim Halberstam (1793-1876) of Nowy Sącz (Sanz), author of Divrei Chaim and a son-in-law of Rabbi Boruch Frankel Thumim (1760-1828), rabbi of Lipn?k nad Bečvou (Yiddish: Leipnik) and author of Boruch Taam.



The Divrei Chaim was a disciple of Rabbi Naftali of Ropshitz, who was a disciple of Rabbi Elimelech of Lizhensk, who was a disciple of the Maggid of Mezritch, who was a disciple of the Baal Shem Tov, the founder of Hasidism.



The Divrei Chaim had 14 children.



His seven sons were: Rabbi Yechezkel Shraga Halberstam (1814-1898) of Shinive; Rabbi Duvid Halberstam (1821-1894) of Chrzanow; Rabbi Meir Nosson Halberstam (1827-1855), father of Rabbi Shlomo Halberstam, the first Bobover Rebbe; Rabbi Boruch Halberstam (1829-1906) of G?rlitz; Rabbi Aharon Halberstam, his successor in Nowy Sącz; Rabbi Shulem Lazer Halberstam of Ratzferd (1862-1944), who was murdered by the Nazis; and Rabbi Yeshaye Halberstam of Częstochowa (Yiddish: Czhechoiv) (1864-1944), who was also killed in the Holocaust.



Among his seven daughters were Ruchel who was married Rabbi Mordecai Dov Twerski, the Admor of Hornisteipel.



The Divrei Chaim (named after his work by that name) was antecedent to several hassidic dynasties including the Klausenberg and Bobov sects.



The Sanz Hassidim have a yichus document showing how they are descended via the Maharal of Prague from Rabbi Yoseph I of Rome, who in turn claimed to be a descendant of King David.



In Israel the Sanz hassidim are well known for the Laniado Hospital in Netanya which they built and continue to operate as a privately administered public hospital providing medical care to residents of Netanya and the northern Sharon areas.



The group has a main synagogue in the heavily hassidic Williamsburg section of Brooklyn, and a strong presence in Jersey City, New Jersey.