Canadian jihadist who fought for ISIS taken into custody in US

Mohammed Khalifa, 38, narrated violent propaganda videos of the ISIS terrorist organization.

Tags: Jihadists ISIS
Arutz Sheva Staff ,

ISIS
ISIS
Reuters

A Canadian jihadist who fought for the Islamic State (ISIS) group and narrated violent propaganda videos has been taken into custody by the United States and charged, the Justice Department said Saturday, according to AFP.

Mohammed Khalifa, 38 and born in Saudi Arabia, was captured during a firefight in January 2019 by Kurdish-dominated Syrian forces allied with the United States.

He was handed over "recently" to US authorities and charged in Virginia with conspiring to provide material support to IS resulting in death, said a Justice Department statement quoted by AFP.

Khalifa left Canada in 2013 to join ISIS in Syria, and by the next year had become a key member of its propaganda team because of his fluent English and Arabic, according to the statement.

He allegedly served as a lead translator in ISIS propaganda production and as the English-speaking narrator on two violent recruitment videos.

This cell was behind videos showing the beheadings of foreigners, including US journalists James Foley and Steven Sotloff, who died in 2014.

He faces a possible life sentence in the United States. Canada hopes to charge him as well.

This is the first known indictment of a foreign ISIS fighter in America since President Joe Biden took office in January.

Two members of the British ISIS terrorist squad known as “The Beatles” were each charged last year with hostage-taking resulting in death, conspiracy to commit murder against US citizens abroad, and conspiracy to provide material support to terrorists. Prosecutors have said both men could face life in prison.

One of the so-called “Beatles”, Alexanda Kotey, last month pleaded guilty to all charges against him in federal court in Alexandria, Virginia.

Kotey and another British ISIS member, El Shafee Elsheikh, were accused them of being "leading participants in a brutal hostage-taking scheme" that resulted in the deaths of Western hostages, including American journalists James Foley and Steven Sotloff, aid workers David Haines, Allan Henning, Peter Kassig and Kayla Mueller, and Japanese hostage Kenji Goto.

A fourth member of the so-called “Beatles”, Aine Davis, is imprisoned in Turkey on terrorism charges.

The group's leader, Mohammed Emwazi who was known as “Jihadi John”, was killed in an air strike in 2015 in Syria after an intensive manhunt.



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