Why The "Perfect Match" Might Not Work Out

Maybe that’s why it shook me up so much the other day to see Eliezer - our hero - crying to himself late at night at the kitchen table.

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 Eliezer Avraham and his kallah.
Eliezer Avraham and his kallah.
צילום: Vaad HaRabbanim

I’ve always been a pretty normal kid, but there’s one thing that makes me different: I’ve never met my Mom.

Just a few hours after my bris, she collapsed and passed away. She was only 34 years old.

So I never knew what it was like to have a Mom get me dressed in the morning, take me to school, or come to meetings with my teacher. The person who did all those things instead was my brother, Eliezer.

My brother Eliezer is my hero. He was a teenager when our Mom passed away, and he took over everything around the house so that our Dad could focus on his work. It was Eliezer who came to my gan party, sitting with the other mothers, clapping as I sang the alef bais. Eliezer who picked me up the day I felt sick, who tucked me in and closed the curtains so I could rest. Eliezer who rode his bike to the vegetable sale for low-income families and put on the cholent for Shabbat.

Maybe that’s why it shook me up so much the other day to see Eliezer - our hero - crying to himself late at night at the kitchen table.

Last month, he got engaged. The match is perfect, and he’s been so happy. But the wedding is getting closer and no matter how hard our Dad works, there isn’t enough money to make a wedding or set the couple up with an apartment. They might have to call the wedding off.

Eliezer & his kalah registered with Vaad HaRabbanim, who opened a hachnasat kallah fund to help them cover the basics, but they aren’t even close to having what they need.

Right now, my hero needs a hero. Can you help



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