Australian judge: Neo-Nazi poses terror risk if let out of jail

31-year old man who wrote about committing a mass shooting may be placed in indefinite detention or extended supervision.

Dan Verbin, Canada ,

Australia
Australia
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An Australian neo-Nazi who fantasized about committing a mass shooting is a risk to society if let out of jail, an Australian judge ruled, according to The Guardian.

Michael Holt “poses an unacceptable risk of committing a serious terrorism offence if not either detained or supervised,” New South Wales Supreme Court Justice Natalie Adams said on Thursday.

Adams ruled that Holt, 31, who media described as a “radicalized white supremacist” will be given a 28-day interim detention after his current sentence for firearms offenses expires on September 9.

When he was sentenced, the judge read from texts he had written that said, “My hate increases every day, my rage exponentially so … I always fantasize about mass homicide when I’m in crowds and crowded places … I dream of it all the time.”

The judge described him as being obsessed with guns and “extremely dangerous.”

Holt is an adherent of the Christian Separatist Church whose belief is that the “the white race is superior to other races.” Its members display “open hatred towards Judaism.”

During an interview, Hold admitted to posting online his admiration for Hitler. During a group program in prison, he was witnesses making the Nazi salute.

During a 2020 search of Hot’s cell, Adams said that extremist material was discovered, including "vile comments directed at people of the Jewish faith and people of African heritage.”

Adams rules that Hold will undergo a psychiatric evaluation before she makes a final decision on New South Wales' application for him to be subjected to an indefinite detention order or an extended supervision order.

New South Wales is experiencing a severe problem with the spread of neo-Nazi ideology. The Brisbane Times reported that counter-terrorism police in the Australian province are reportedly tracking over 1,000 people linked to Neo Nazi groups and right wing extremism.

(Arutz Sheva’s North American desk is keeping you updated until the start of Shabbat in New York. The time posted automatically on all Arutz Sheva articles, however, is Israeli time.)



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