US Treasury sanctions procurement network supplying Iranian military firm

“Iranian regime utilizes a global network of companies to advance its destabilizing military capabilities,” said Secretary Steven T. Mnuchin

Yoni Kempinski ,

Archive: Iranian money and weapons
Archive: Iranian money and weapons
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Today (Tuesday), the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) designated a network of six companies and four individuals that facilitated the procurement of sensitive goods, including U.S.-origin electronic components, for Iran Communication Industries (ICI), an Iranian military firm designated by the United States in 2008 and by the European Union in 2010 for being owned or controlled by Iran’s Ministry of Defense and Armed Forces Logistics (MODAFL), the overall manager and coordinator of Iran’s ballistic missile program. ICI, a subsidiary of Iran Electronics Industries, which falls under MODAFL, produces various items including military communication systems, avionics, information technology, electronic warfare, and missile launchers.

“The Iranian regime utilizes a global network of companies to advance its destabilizing military capabilities,” said Secretary Steven T. Mnuchin. “The United States will continue to take action against those who help to support the regime’s militarization and proliferation efforts.”

Treasury’s action is being taken pursuant to Executive Order (E.O.) 13382, an authority aimed at freezing the assets of proliferators of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and their supporters. Concurrent with Treasury’s designations, the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Columbia is filing charges by criminal complaint against two entities and one individual that have also been designated today.

OFAC explains that as a result of today’s action, all property and interests in property of these targets that are in the United States or in the possession or control of U.S. persons must be blocked and reported to OFAC. OFAC emphasized that their regulations generally prohibit all dealings by U.S. persons or within the United States (including transactions transiting the United States) that involve any property or interests in property of blocked or designated persons.

In addition, they note: "people that engage in certain transactions with the individuals and entities designated today may themselves be exposed to sanctions or subject to an enforcement action. Furthermore, unless an exception applies, any foreign financial institution that knowingly facilitates a significant transaction for any of the individuals or entities designated today could be subject to U.S. sanctions".



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