Ha'aretz journalist: 'MK Bezalel Smotrich more of an enemy than Lebanon'

Ha'aretz journalist attacked MK Smotrich, 'How's he better than Christians who stood by as Jews suffered in Europe?'

Arutz Sheva Staff ,

Smotrich at Ha'aretz composium
Smotrich at Ha'aretz composium
Tomer Applebaum

Ha'aretz journalist Rogel Alpher attacked MK Bezalel Smotrich in his news column Thursday following the Yamina MK's remarks that Israel should defer from providing humanitarian aid to Lebanon following the deadly explosion in Beirut Tuesday.

Alpher expressed shock at what he termed Smotrich's "indifference in the face of the human catastrophe taking place across the border, which also includes women and children and not just potential Hezbollah [terrorists]," labeling it "appalling."

"How can he be called human?" asked the Ha'aretz journalist. "How is he better than Christians who stood by while Jews suffered in Europe?" he continued.

"[Smotrich] is the only one who's cruel here. And he must not be pitied. In a society with a high level of universal morality, the racist and fascist Smotrich [is so disgusting, he should be shunned]. He's my enemy, much more so than Lebanese civilians injured in the blast," asserted Alpher.

Alpher's remarks come on the footsteps of MK Smotrich's statement that "with regard to aid proposals to Lebanon, a clear distinction must be made on two levels: If it helps us politically, if we get rewarded in the international arena and if it is, in any way, our interest, fine. But on an ethical level, we have absolutely zero obligation to come to the aid of an unmistakably enemy state. 'Those who pity the cruel will end up being cruel to the merciful,'" he said, quoting the Talmud.

Yesterday, (Wednesday) former MK Moshe Feiglin responded to outrage that resulted over his expressing a more extreme sentiment regarding the incident. "If it was us, and I hope it was us, then we should be proud of it, and with that we will create a balance of terror. By avoiding saying it's us - we are putting ourselves on the dark side of morality," Feiglin was quoted as saying in an interview with Radio 103FM.

"We are all allowed to rejoice that it exploded in the port of Beirut and not in Tel Aviv," he added.

The controversy erupted after Feiglin posted a Facebook message celebrating the explosion and noting that it took place just prior to the start of the Jewish festival of Tu B'Av.

"You don't really believe that this was some messy fuel warehouse, right? Do you understand that this hell was supposed to fall on us in the form of a rain of missiles?!" wrote Feiglin.



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