Poll: Likud rebounds, right-wing moves up to 64 seats

New poll shows Likud, Blue and White no longer in free fall, right-wing bloc expands its majority, with Likud at 35, Yamina at 12.

David Rosenberg ,

Binyamin Netanyahu at cabinet meeting June 28th 2020
Binyamin Netanyahu at cabinet meeting June 28th 2020
Reuters

The Likud party’s position has stabilized, a new poll shows, ending the ruling faction’s electoral free fall.

According to a new poll by Direct Polls, if new elections were held today, the Likud would win 35 seats.

That’s down from the 36 seats the Likud currently has, but it marks an improvement over the previous Direct Polls survey, released on July 22nd, which showed the party with just 33 seats.

While the Likud had polled in the low 40s since mid-March, during the first wave of the coronavirus, in July the party plunged in the polls amid growing public frustration with the ongoing coronavirus pandemic and government handling of the crisis.

The center-left Blue and White party, the Likud’s election rival-turned coalition ally, also appears to have stabilized, after plummeting to eight seats in the previous Direct Polls survey. Tuesday’s poll shows Blue and White inching upwards to nine seats.

The Yesh Atid-Telem alliance holds stable at 18 seats, the same number the party received in the July 22nd poll.

The poll also found that if new elections were held today, the Joint Arab List would win 16 seats, one more than it currently has.

The rightist Yamina party, which won six seats in the March election but fell to five seats when the Jewish Home bolted to join the coalition government, would win 12 seats if new elections were held today.

The Jewish Home party would not cross the electoral threshold, the poll found, receiving just 0.3% of the vote – far below the 3.25% needed to enter the Knesset.

Otzma Yehudit, which failed to enter the Knesset, would receive 0.4% of the vote if new elections were held today.

Among the haredi factions, Shas would win 10 seats if new elections were held today, a gain of one mandate compared to the previous election, while United Torah Judaism would retain its seven seats.

The far-left Meretz party, which won three seats on a joint list with Labor and Gesher in the March election would rise to five seats if new elections were held today – down one from last month’s Direct Polls survey.

Both Labor and Gesher would fail to enter the Knesset if new elections were held today, receiving 1.1% and 0.4% respectively.

The centrist Derech Eretz faction, which broke away from Telem to join the government, would receive 2.2% of the vote if new elections were held today, just over one percent below the 3.25% threshold.



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