Sorry, Caroline, you missed the mark on this one

There is something critical missing from your plan, Caroline, and that lack dooms it to failure. Opinion.

Tzvi Fishman ,

The Israel-Diaspora Connection
The Israel-Diaspora Connection
Istock

The insightful and erudite Caroline Glick is one-hundred-percent correct in rejecting the new Ministry of Diaspora Affairs plan designed to help the stricken Jewish Diaspora and to strengthen the Israel-Diaspora connection. Justifiably, she writes: “The 10-page decision is heavy on platitudes but empty of substance.”

She is also absolutely correct in pointing out the vapidity of its progressive, liberal call for “Tikun Olam,” one of the colorful banners of the Reform Movement in its effort to de-Judaize Judaism.

Accordingly, Caroline Glick rightly asks:

“So what is Israel to do?”

And she answers:

“Israel should develop true and honest partnerships with Jews on the grassroots levels of stressed and weakened Diaspora communities by providing them with services that they need and that Israel is in a position to render. There are three areas where Israel can be of greatest assistance: education, religious services, and security.”

In other words, help in preserving Jewish life in the Diaspora.

She misses the main point and that is, making sure the goal of the educational, religious and even security assistance she suggests is focussed on encouraging Diaspora Jews to come on aliya. The educational material she remembers from decades ago was aimed at that goal and today, of the various programs sending Orthodox Israeli rabbis to the Diaspora, Torah Mitzion religious post-IDF service Zionist rabbis and Torah students succeed in doing exactly that.

Her plan is just another plan that ignores the God of Israel, who has sent the plague of Corona and increasing anti-Semitism, not to strengthen the Galut but to eliminate it completely. Why? Because the Exile was never meant to last forever. Why? Because Jewish life in the Diaspora is the greatest Desecration of God’s Name in the world. As Hashem Himself declares through the prophet Ezekiel, the same Ezekiel who envisioned the Diaspora as a valley of dry and scattered bones:

“And when they came to the nations into which they came, they profaned My Holy Name, in that men said of them: These are the people of the Lord, and they are gone out of His land” (Ezekiel, 36:20).

This prophecy is coming to tell us the mere fact that Jews are living outside the Land of Israel is a desecration of God. Why? Because in the eyes of the Gentiles, our presence in the Diaspora proclaims that God lacks the power to keep His Chosen People in His Land. That was back then in Ezekiel’s days. Now in our time, when God has returned the Land of Israel to the Jews, the situation is even worse, for it seems, in the eyes of the Gentiles, that in clinging to our Diaspora communities, we prefer foreign lands to His.

In contrast, the greatest sanctification of God is that which involves all of the Jewish People, as the prophecy of Ezekiel proclaims:

“And I will sanctify My great Name which was profaned amidst the nations, which you have profaned in the midst of them. And the nations shall know that I am the Lord, when I shall be sanctified in you before their eyes” (Ezekiel, 36:23-24).

How will G-d bring about this great Kiddush Hashem (Sanctification of God) in the world?” The Prophet continues:

“For I will take you from among the nations, and gather you out of all the countries, and I will bring you into your own Land” (Ibid).

Caroline Glick rightfully rejects the empty new plan of the Ministry of Diaspora Affairs, but she merely substitutes more of the same. In order to strengthen Diaspora Jewry, she advises that Israel produce books for the Diaspora about Jewish Heritage, Jewish History, Israel, and Judaism, along with primers to learn Hebrew. Israel should also send more rescue teams of educators and Rabbis from Israel to Jewish communities throughout the Diaspora. And Israel, she claims, should provide Diaspora communities with protection so that they can continue Diaspora life in security and peace. I estimate that about 100 IDF battalions should do the trick.

Forget it. No amount of increased Jewish education can build a wall against the tsunami of intermarriage and ever-increasing assimilation that is decimating the Jewish People in foreign Gentile lands. And no amount of Israeli security technology or undercover soldiers will keep the angry mobs at bay. Aliyah is the only chance we have to save Diaspora Jewry. That has to be the goal. To save the ones who decide to come. As for all of the others – only God can help.

Tzvi Fishman was awarded the Israel Ministry of Education Prize for Jewish Culture and Creativity. Before making Aliyah to Israel in 1984, he was a successful Hollywood screenwriter. He has co-authored 4 books with Rabbi David Samson, based on the teachings of Rabbis A. Y. Kook and T. Y. Kook. His other books include: "The Kuzari For Young Readers" and "Tuvia in the Promised Land". His books are available on Amazon. Recently, he directed the movie, "Stories of Rebbe Nachman."



top