Jews and the non-Jews who love them

When a non-Jew recognizes that the Torah is true, from whom do they learn Torah? Dr. Rivkah Lambert Adler has the answer.

Judy Simon,

Dr. Rivkah Lambert Adler
Dr. Rivkah Lambert Adler
By PR

Dr. Rivkah Lambert Adler chanced upon quite a few non-Jews who had rejected the religions in which they had been raised, commemorated Saturday as the Day of Rest, and refrained from eating pork and shellfish. Some of these folks had been quietly changing their perspective on life for a decade or more. They were not interested in converting to Judaism. "What's going on here?" she asked.

"We read the Bible. We understand that G-d goes with the Jewish People, and we want to go with you too," she was told.

"Why don't you convert to Judaism?" Rivkah asked. "Because G-d created us as we are. We intend to serve the L-rd as non-Jews."

One of the people that Rivkah met had highlighted all of the passages in Tanach (the Bible) that were a message to the nations. Many of them visit Israel frequently. They say that they see G-d's promises to the Jewish People being fulfilled, just as the prophets of old predicted.

Rivkah wanted to write an article about the phenomenon. She ended up publishing a book called "Ten From the Nations." It was after the publication of the book that Rivkah started to realize the sheer number of people who were trying to connect in one way or another to the Jewish People. That's when she started the Torah School for the Nations, a place where non-Jews can learn about the laws of the Torah that apply to them, and to read the Tanach in the original Hebrew, using age-old Jewish commentaries.

It is a process that is not without criticism. And Rivkah understands this. She says that it's natural for Jews to want to put on protective armor. "For two thousand years the actions of the Church against our people were despicable. But the creation of Israel has changed the minds of many Christians, who are waking up to recognize that the Jewish People are indeed G-d's people," Rivkah explains. "If you can picture a bridge, we are a handful of Jews and a few dozen non-Jews who are coming from the opposite sides of the bridge and meeting in the middle. We are misunderstood by the people who are not on the bridge."

Tune in to meet a fine Jewish woman, who leads a good life by example, and who is on a path toward becoming "a light unto the Nations."




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