The yellow badge marking Jews began in Babylonia

'Math is important, but it's no less important to recognize our history as the Jewish nation,' Bar Ilan University's Dr. Ohayon says.

Tags: Babylonia
Arutz Sheva Staff ,

Yellow badge
Yellow badge
Flash 90

On Monday, the Dahan Center and the Babylonian Jewry Heritage Center hosted a conference focusing on the Jews of Bavel (Babylonia).

The conference focused on the new age and the Jews' contribution to Babylonia from the time they were exiled from ancient Israel until Ezra and Nehemia led them back home.

Dr. Shimon Ohayon, Director at Bar Ilan University's Dahan Center, said, "Not many know, but the yellow badge to mark Jews began in Babylonia. There was a magnificent community, a few of them immigrated to Israel after Cyrus' announcement, but most of them remained in Babylonia. We have merited one of the most magnificent creations in history, written by Babylonia's Jews - the Babylonian Talmud. Unfortunately, today we are focused mostly on a few Today we will focus mostly on which level math students learn. That's important, but it's no less important to recognize our history as the Jewish nation scattered all around the world and returned to its land after 2,000 years of exile."

Dr. Zvi Yehuda, Director of the Research institute Director at The Babylonian Jewry Heritage Center, said, "Ezekiel's grave, which was one of the symbols of Babylonia's Jewish community, has not yet been destroyed, but it has been turned into a mosque and Jews are not allowed to enter. It has been made part of a mosque's complex. They erased the nearby synagogue. Today in order to reach the gravesite, you need to pass through the mosque. They don't allow Jews to enter mosques, because in their eyes, Jews are impure."

"We at the Babylonian Jewish Heritage Center are proud to work with the oldest of Israel's communities, the Babylonian Jewish community, and to spread its work and contribution to others. It's an honor for us to work together with Bar Ilan University and the Dahan Center to spread the glory of Babylonian Jewry," Professor Efrain Sadka, Babylonian Jewry Heritage Center chairman said.



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