Learning competition bans unvaccinated students

New York 'Chidon' bans unvaccinated students recently exposed to measles patient, asks parents and schools to act responsibly.

Chana Roberts,

Religious schoolchildren (illustrative)
Religious schoolchildren (illustrative)
Flash90

A Crown Heights learning competition has banned unvaccinated students who were exposed to measles from participating, COLLIVE reported.

Shimmy Weinbaum, director of the Chidon learning competition currently taking place in Crown Heights, wrote a letter to parents and principals informing them of his decision.

In his letter, which was published on COLLIVE, Weinbaum wrote: "There has been a confirmed case of measles in the Crown Heights community."

"Our Safety Committee asked that we seek advice from a community doctor. We are currently in the process of communication and will keep you informed.

"As director of the Chidon, it is my responsibility to notify you that Tzivos Hashem cannot and will not take any responsibility for anyone who is Chas Veshalom (G-d forbid - ed.) exposed to measles or impacted in any way.

"Being that the carrier was in Oholei Torah while the children were in the building, the health department and local doctors have banned any unvaccinated Oholei Torah child from participating in the Chidon.

"With regard to all other children, it is up to each school and parent to do what's best for their child."

Weinbaum signed the letter wishing everyone "health, good news and nachas (happiness - ed.) from our children."

Earlier this week, COLLIVE reported that Congregation Lubavitch of New Haven has asked unvaccinated adults and children "not to attend services or any community events."

The synagogue was contacted by the New Haven Health Department due to a measles outbreak in both New Haven County and New York, the site said.

The synagogue's president, Moti Sandman, noted, that "consultations with rabbinical and medical authorities have indicated...that this measles outbreak constitutes a potentially serious health risk to those members of our community who have compromised immune systems."

"Vaccinations are a vital way of stopping the spread of this disease," he added, emphasizing that the synagogue asks "anyone who chooses not to vaccinate themselves or their children not to attend services or any community events until this health crisis has ended."

Current estimates are that the measles outbreak began in Europe, later spreading to Israel and from there to the United States via unvaccinated individuals..




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