'Difficult to understand State's conduct'

Regavim at Supreme Court hearing wonders about state conduct regarding illegal Bedouin construction and lack of law enforcement.

Hezki Baruch,

Regavim at the Supreme Court
Regavim at the Supreme Court
Hezki Baruch

The Supreme Court today discussed two petitions filed by the Regavim movement that dealt with illegal Bedouin land takeover.

One of the petitions dealt with 20 structures illegally built by Bedouins while taking over Kfar Adumim land. Regavim refers to the area as Khan al-Ahmar 2 because of its proximity to Khan al-Ahmar.

Attorney Avi Segal representing Regavim finds it difficult to understand State conduct in this case: "We submitted a petition to understand why the State doesn't demolish these structures. The State reached a rather strange agreement with the Bedouin that we strongly opposed, to allow them to request a building permit for the illegally constructed structures. This agreement was also given the validity of a judgment. To this day, of course, the Bedouin have submitted no request for a permit, besides the fact that these requests are hopeless because they're on Israeli territory."

Attorney Avi Segal
Hezki Baruch

However, according to Segal, the judges preferred to accept the State position. "The Supreme Court suggested we delete the petition at this stage, because the Bedouin haven't yet submitted requests for building permits, while preserving our full rights to claim illegal construction in the future.

"It's very difficult to understand how the State allows illegal builders to submit requests for a building permit where there isn't even a chance of legalizing the structures. The State's conduct is particularly puzzling after we saw the Court ruled that Khan al-Ahmar could be demolished, and yet the State doesn't destroy. It's no wonder the State's also trying to postpone the inevitable end."




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