'There are limits even to freedom of speech'

MKs and residents call on religious kibbutz to cancel event with radical group Breaking the silence. 'Their words are used by anti-Semites.'

Hezki Baruch,

Moti Yogev
Moti Yogev
Flash 90

MK Moti Yogev (Jewish Home), a member of the Knesset Foreign Affairs and Defense Committee, responded Wednesday to reports on the controversy surrounding the Breaking the Silence organization's invitation to a meeting at the religious kibbutz Ma'aleh Gilboa.

"There is a limit to freedom of expression," Yogev told Arutz Sheva. Breaking the Silence is an organization whose goal is to smear the name of the State of Israel and IDF soldiers, using lies and manipulations. The actions of this organization endanger the State of Israel and our soldiers."

"I hope that those who have to make the right decision will accept it and prevent them from entering the kibbutz, as they were prevented from entering many other places, out of the understanding that [the well-being] of the IDF soldiers is above all else, certainly before freedom of expression to slander them. If there is an exception, he will be questioned in the IDF. There is nor army in the world which is more moral than the IDF."

MK Amir Ohana (Likud), who worked to prevent the radical organization from speaking at Israel high schools, said: "I hope the members of Kibbutz Ma'ale Gilboa make the right decision, to protect those who protect us. This organization acts against the State of Israel and the IDF soldiers and its materials are used by anti-Semitic elements who act against the State of Israel in order to attack it and harm IDF soldiers."

Earlier, it was reported that there was anger among many members of Kibbutz Ma'aleh Gilboa over the initiative of one of the kibbutz members to invite the extreme leftist organization to a meeting at the kibbutz club next Wednesday.

Salit Rappaport, a member of the kibbutz, told Arutz Sheva that the event crossed a red line. "We heard about the event via Facebook and there is a lot of anger. Most of the public here opposes their lies and if the resident wants to hold the meeting, he should do it [privately] in his home.

"He is a good person with radical views, so I'm not surprised, but it hurts me that the kibbutz should serve as a host for activities that are contrary to all our beliefs. My husband has been on reserve duty for two and a half weeks, and he tells me all the time how much they are trying to be as decent as possible," Rapaport said.




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