EU Pushes for Gaza Ceasefire Extension

EU ambassadors say lack of long-term agreement will lead to more violence, provision of EU aid dependent on progress.

AFP and Arutz Sheva Staff ,

Foreign investment just keeps on rising...
Foreign investment just keeps on rising...
Flash 90

The European Union (EU) warned Wednesday that violence could re-ignite in Gaza within "months" if Israel and Hamas fail to consolidate a fragile ceasefire through serious talks.

The EU ambassador to Israel, Lars Faaborg-Andersen, and John Gatt-Rutter, envoy to the Palestinian Authority (PA) and Gaza, spoke to journalists in Jerusalem just two weeks after a bloody and destructive conflict in the tiny coastal territory that killed more than 73 Israelis and an unclear number of Palestinian Arabs.

"The destruction in Gaza has been devastating and we feel that if the situation goes unaddressed, there is still a considerable potential for violence," Faaborg-Andersen warned, saying this could come "in a matter of months." 

The EU has pushed for indirect talks to resume between Israel and terror organization Hamas, which controls Gaza after the initial ceasefire was agreed on August 26.

"Hopefully it will be possible still to get the negotiations up and running very quickly," he said.

Hamas's exiled deputy leader said Wednesday that talks were to resume mid-September in Cairo.

Under terms of the truce, the parties agreed to resume Egyptian-brokered negotiations within a month to discuss Hamas's laundry list of unprecedented demands, including a Hamas demand for a port and an airport and terrorist releases. Israel's demands for Gaza to be demilitarized will allegedly be discussed as well. 

Israel agreed as part of the initial ceasefire to immediately ease restrictions on the entry of goods, humanitarian aid and construction materials into Gaza, and to expand the fishing zone off Gaza to six nautical miles.

But Hamas has already indicated it intends to rearm, and Israel has said it will reject the port and airport demand. 

Gatt-Rutter said the provision of EU aid would depend on how much progress is made in any negotiations.

"A number of conditions need to be met before we start to think about identifying the kind of funds that can actually have a real impact on the reconstruction of Gaza, huge residential swathes of which were destroyed by Israeli bombardment," he claimed.

"It's essential that we use the next four weeks to actually come to... understandings... that would allow us as the European Union to work together with our partners in identifying the kind of funds that can make a difference."

The remarks came a month ahead of a donor conference on Gaza, and after the UN and the Palestinian government called for $551 million (427 million euros) in aid to help hundreds of thousands of Gazans affected by the conflict's aftermath.

It is unclear how much of that money will actually be used to help Palestinian Arab civilians, however, as the IDF proved during the fifty-day Operation Protective Edge that Hamas spent billions of dollars in reconstruction money and materials on weapons and terror tunnels. 




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