Egypt, Tunisians Suffer, GDP Up

For the past five years the quality of life for Egyptians and Tunisians has deteriorated -- but the economy in both countries has improved.

Chana Ya'ar , | updated: 8:44 PM

Protest in Giza, Egypt
Protest in Giza, Egypt
Israel news photo: Wikicommons, Sharif

For the past five years the quality of life for Egyptians and Tunisians has deteriorated despite an increase in the GDP, according to the Gallup survey organization.

The Washington D.C.-based group released a report last week showing that the number of Egyptians classified as "thriving" fell from 29 percent in 2005 to only 11 percent last year.

The findings were based on face-to-face interviews conducted in 2009 and 2010 with some 2,000 people ages 15 and up in each country.

In Tunisia, only 24 percent of the population was considered to be "thriving" in 2008 -- the first year in which the statistic was available -- and that figure dropped to 14 percent in 2010.

The Gallup classifications broke out the population into three categories of "thriving," "suffering" and "struggling," based on the Cantril Self-Anchoring Striving ladder scale. The classifications were based on how respondents rated their current and future lives.

The report noted that wellbeing in Egypt and Tunisia was among the worst in the Middle East and North Africa last year. Egypt ranked third from the bottom in a list of 14 countries plus the Palestinian Authority territories; Tunisia was fifth from last.

However, in both countries, the GDP rose at a steady rate since 2005. Figures gleaned from the International Monetary Fund's World Economic Outlook database showed that although Egypt in 2005 had a GDP of $4,762, by 2010 it had grown to $6,367.

Tunisia's GDP, which in 2005 was $7,182, had grown by last year to $9,489.



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