Israel’s New Government: Three Women to Watch

David Rubin,

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David Rubin
David Rubin is former mayor of Shiloh, Israel. He is founder and president of Shiloh Israel Children"s Fund, and the author of five books, including The Islamic Tsunami and his latest, More Sparks From Zion. For more info, click on these links: www.DavidRubinIsrael.com or www.ShilohIsraelChildren.org...

While the exaggerated emphasis on the physical appearance of female politicians around the world is absolutely unfair, and even sexist, the title of this article is merely a play on words, as it refers to the non-physical attributes of three very capable women in Prime Minister Netanyahu’s new governing coalition. In this coalition, there are some new faces and some old ones, but who are the ones that we should watch closely as they take up their new ministerial posts?

The answer:

Tzipi Hotovely (Likud) - Deputy Foreign Minister - The PM refused to appoint a Foreign Minister, officially reserving the po‎sition for himself, with the thought of possibly appointing  current oppo‎sition members Avigdor Liberman (Yisrael Beytenu) or Yitzhak Herzog (Zionist Union) to the po‎sition, thereby broadening his coalition . This may, however,  be an unlikely scenario, and Netanyahu’s desire not to fill the po‎sition may, in reality, be partially due to his fear of emboldening future political rivals within the Likud, such as Gilad Erdan, Yisrael Katz, or Silvan Shalom. In any event, the lack of a full-time Foreign Minister certainly empowers the appointed Deputy Foreign Minister, Tzipi Hotovely, a religious, right-wing MK, who is a firm proponent of Jewish sovereignty in Judea and Samaria (the so-called West Bank). Hotovely has never hidden her opinions and can be expected to share them with the many world leaders and media figures whom she is certain to meet.

Miri Regev (Likud) - Minister of Culture and Sport - The appointment of the outspoken Regev is already causing violent conniptions in the bodies of the leftist elites that dominate Israeli culture and entertainment. Asked for her opinion of the Regev appointment, Singer Ahinoam Nini responded, "Miri Regev as Culture Minister? I don't believe it. Shock and amazement." Performer Shayke Levy told the Walla media site : "How do I feel about the appointment? I am out of feelings. I am empty of feelings. I don't know where it is leading us. I really don't know where it is leading. .. It seems the world is about to be destroyed. It must be the end of the world, so they are distributing the loot and that's all. I think it's a loss of direction.” Such bombastic statements would indicate that some of the official left-wing biases in the world of state-supported culture may be tempered by the new minister, who seems determined to take her job quite seriously and is unlikely to be easily intimidated.

Ayelet Shaked (Jewish Home) - Justice Minister - As an activist MK, Shaked often voiced her disapproval at the self-selecting Supreme Court system and the secular- left biases of the legal system as a whole. Add to this the problem of a string of attorney-generals who have stymied the efforts of the people of Israel, and occasionally their government, to provide security to the nation and to exercise their rights to live in all parts of the Land of Israel currently in our possession. Expect the no-nonsense Minister Shaked to confront these challenges using all of the powers granted to her office.  

The three competent women described above can each be expected to spare no effort in attempting to shake up the system, by ceasing to accept the old, failed and tired mantras of land for peace, judicial activism, and the “legitimate rights” of the so-called Palestinians. A proud Israeli narrative would be a novel change from the accepted norms, as provided by the left-wing secular elites of Israeli society. Will the PM allow his new ministers the autonomy to be proactive on behalf of Israel?