What Do We Want?

Gershon Perlman,

לבן ריק
לבן ריק
צילום: ערוץ 7
Gershon Perlman
Raised in a secular environment in the USA until as a university student Gershon Perlman left everything behind in the 1970s to become an observant Jew living in Israel. He is a 23 year veteran of Gush Katif has raised a family and works as an ESL teacher. He has unique and deep insights in matters of Israel and the Jewish People.

What Do We Want?

                Before elections, as before any other decision, we must ask: what do we want? Over forty years ago as a university student in the USA, I asked myself: "what do I want of life." My answer was, I want to lead a maximum Jewish life; meaning taking upon the responsibilities of being a Jew. This meant observing the mitzvoth, living in Israel, serving in the IDF, getting married and raising a family. I wasn't personally ambitious, but wanted to guarantee that my children would grow up knowing who, what and why they are. I also wanted to go the extra mile and live over the Green Line - the liberated territories; I wanted my aliyah to be relevant.

                In every election I voted for Rabbi Meir Kahane, because he represented what I wanted: a Jewish state, rather than a state of a lot of Jews. He thought of the good of the country rather than any personal benefits, he even donated his Knesset salary to the poor. He would not  sacrifice his vision even for his life. After the Likud and Labor parties ganged up on him and disqualified him, I continued to vote for the parties that put the integrity of the liberated territories first and foremost. From 1978 onward half the time my choices didn't even pass the threshold.

                There are many issues at stake in these elections, but I've been saying that to myself since the first elections I voted in, in 1980. The feeling of preventing impending tragedy is as thick as always. The choice between the Jewish state and the state of Jews has not changed, and probably never will. I find myself voting on the exact same issues for forty years.

                Once again I ask myself: what do I want? My answer is always the same, there is one thing that is irreversible and that is the Land of Israel. Every political party has its price on this issue; it is not number one on any list except for Yamina and Otzma. I want to see Otzma in the Knesset, I want its Kahanaist ideology find its rightful place in the mainstream. It is what a Jewish state is about, saving us from within, saving us from internal assimilation as much as the external threats, but our society is not yet there. The proof is in the electoral numbers that don't add up. We still live under the administration of a far-left media and judiciary that tells Israelis how and what to think.

                I'm voting for Yamina, not because it checks all the boxes, but because it checks most of them and has people who get things done. I will not waste a vote to send a message, I've done that often enough, and this time  there is a party that has through action,  proven its commitment to the integrity of The Land of Israel and that needs to be strengthened above all other considerations.