American Jews rally for Israel
American Jews rally for IsraelFlash 90

As the Gaza war continues, the Voice of the Jewish People Survey for April 2024, conducted by the Jewish People Policy Institute (JPPI), offers a comprehensive analysis of the sentiments and perspectives of American Jews.

The survey focuses on various aspects, including perceptions of discrimination, views on US support for Israel, divisions between Jerusalem and Washington, and more, providing valuable insights into the evolving landscape of American Jewish identity and engagement.

The survey shows American Jews across diverse political and denominational affiliations and age groups are noting a palpable sense of increased discrimination against them since the beginning of the war. The majority of American Jews surveyed believe that Israel's actions in Gaza are "acceptable" (83%), but US support for Israel’s war effort is not strong enough.

Most American Jews, 63%, intend to vote for Biden in the 2024 presidential election, compared to 17% who expect to vote for Trump.

While many American Jews express solidarity with Israel, there is a spectrum of opinions regarding the adequacy of US support during the conflict. Notably, liberal Jews tend to perceive the support as sufficient, whereas those leaning toward the center or right voice apprehensions about the level of backing from the Biden administration.

Despite some internal criticism, a majority of American Jews view Israel's actions in Gaza favorably. This perception underscores the deep-seated support for Israel within the community, even amid nuanced discussions about the proportionality of military responses.

JPPI’s president, Professor Yedidia Stern commented: “American Jews, the strongest Diaspora community in Jewish history, are going through a difficult period as evidenced by their perception of anti-Jewish discrimination. On the eve of Holocaust Remembrance Day, it becomes clear that the label 'Jew' continues to evoke dormant seeds of hatred, even in the US.”

Against the backdrop of protests on various campuses across the United States, inundated with harsh expressions of antisemitism and Israel hatred, the index shows a worrying rise in perceptions of discrimination among American Jews since the start of the war in Gaza. According to the survey findings, a decisive majority of American Jews (among survey respondents) believe that there has been an increase in discrimination against them since the start of the Gaza war, to a much greater extent than against Muslims. This feeling is prevalent across all political groups, religious denominations, and age groups.

The majority of American Jews surveyed believe that Israel's actions in Gaza are "acceptable" (83%), but US support for Israel’s war effort is not strong enough. A significant gap is also noted between liberal and conservative US Jews regarding the extent of American government support for Israel: while liberal Jews mostly believe that US support for Israel is "appropriate," centrist and right-wing Jews mostly believe that "the US does not support Israel enough."

Ahead of the November presidential elections, the index data reveal that a majority of American Jews, 63%, intend to vote for Biden, compared to 17% who say they expect to vote for Trump. 11% of respondents said they have not yet decided. Considering similar survey findings from November 2023, the data indicates a possible downward trend in support for Trump among American Jews.

It should be emphasized that this survey does not represent all American Jews but provides a snapshot of a specific group of American Jews involved in the community. The survey was conducted among 700 American Jews registered with the Jewish People Policy Institute’s Voice of the Jewish People respondent panel. The report does not provide a weighted picture that represents the position of "all American Jews," but the number of participants from different groups allows for the identification of trends, clear positions, and disparities between various groups of Jews based on religious affiliation, closeness to Israel, political stance, connection to Judaism, and more.