Sources in the Likud party on Friday said that so long as the war continues, even if the amendments to the Reasonableness Standard are overturned by the Supreme Court, the government will not do anything about it, Kan News reported.

According to the sources, even if the Supreme Court justices do invalidate the amendment to the Basic Law, the government will not act to re-legislate it.

On Thursday, Justice Minister Yariv Levin on Thursday afternoon responded to reports that the Supreme Court intends to invalidate the Reasonableness Standard.

The standard is an amendment to a Basic Law and therefore considered even by the Supreme Court's own precedent to be untouchable and part of Israel's constitution.

"While our soldiers are fighting side-by-side on the various fronts, as the entire country is hurting from the loss of many lives, we must not rip the nation of Israel with disagreements," Levin stressed. "The citizens of Israel expect the Supreme Court not to publish, during a war, a ruling which is controversial even among its own justices."

"From this same expectation, and out of national responsibility, those who were elected to the Knesset by the people are acting to ensure that legislative processes passed in these days pass with broad agreement, while avoiding discussion on matters which are controversial. It would be appropriate for the Supreme Court to act in a similarly responsible fashion and not create a deep rift within the nation, while all of us are begging for its unity," he concluded.

At the end of October, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said, "The judicial reform is not on the agenda" right now. He also said, "After the war, everyone, including myself, will need to answer for this horrific failure."