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Canada: Spying for Israel is a "War Crime"

According to a report in Canada's National Post newspaper yesterday, the Canadian Immigration and Refugee Board has decided to reject the immigration request of a man from southern Lebanon due to his past role as a spy for Israel.
First Publish: 5/16/2003, 2:51 PM

According to a report in Canada's National Post newspaper yesterday, the Canadian Immigration and Refugee Board has decided to reject the immigration request of a man from southern Lebanon due to his past role as a spy for Israel. The man, who allegedly spied on the Hizbullah terrorist organization from 1998 to 1999, sought asylum in Canada after Israeli forces withdrew from southern Lebanon and he was fingered as a Mossad informant by a former superior, putting his life in jeopardy. However, the Canadian IRB decided to deny the unidentified petitioner refugee status on the grounds that he had committed "crimes against peace", "war crimes" or "crimes against humanity".


According to the IRB decision, "there were serious reasons for considering that the claimant had been an accomplice, because of his personal and conscious participation in crimes against humanity committed by Israel and the SLA." According to the decision, the Lebanese man gave Israeli intelligence agents the names of 40 Hizbullah members, informed them of locations used by Hizbullah members, the cars they used and the print shops that produced their materials. The IRB said that captured Hizbullah terrorists would have been mistreated as a result. The National Post's Stewart Bell noted, "Under Canadian law, Hezbollah is considered a terrorist organization because of its involvement in car bombings, hijackings and kidnappings. Despite that, Canadian officials condemned the man, identified only as Mr. X, for his work against the group."

For their decision, Canadian authorities relied on information provided by Human Rights Watch, which accused the Israeli government of being responsible for crimes against humanity, including torture and murder, in southern Lebanon. HRW last accused Israel of committing war crimes in the wake of the IDF's April 2002 counter-terrorist offensive in Jenin, a charge they persisted in making even after backpedaling on charges that Israel had committed a massacre in the city.

According to the Post, the Canadian Jewish Congress is drafting a response to the IRB, complaining that its ruling relied on "distorted" assertions. Ronen Gil-Or, the deputy head of mission at the Israeli embassy said, "Israel did not and has not been involved in any war crimes or crimes against humanity in southern Lebanon or any other place." Hizbullah, the Post noted, continues to fire rockets at northern Israeli towns.