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Hamas-Fatah Dispute Over Which Jews To Murder

Despite the "ceasefire" agreement purportedly reached in London yesterday, Hamas announced today that it would continue to murder Israelis. Arab affairs journalist Tzvi Yechezkeli told Arutz-7 today that though Arafat signed on the agreement, "this doesn't mean that the other terrorist groups agree to it..."
First Publish: 1/15/2003, 5:58 PM

Despite the "ceasefire" agreement purportedly reached in London yesterday, Hamas announced today that it would continue to murder Israelis. Abdel Aziz Rantisi, a leading Hamas figure in Gaza, denied today that all the terror organizations had agreed to call off attacks until after the Israeli elections. Yasser Arafat was reported yesterday to have agreed to enforce a "no attack" period until the elections, during which civilians of pre-1967 Israel would be exempt from being murdered.

Arab affairs journalist Tzvi Yechezkeli told Arutz-7 today that though Arafat signed on the agreement, "this doesn't mean that the other terrorist groups agree to it. Arafat's position on this may deter some of the Al Aksa Brigades terrorists, who still receive their salaries from the PA, but the fact is that the local terrorist leaders don't always listen to Arafat... But Hamas has no reason to sign on such an agreement. Even though Hamas was forced into talking with Fatah about these issues, but it has no reason to want to give up its 'winning card' of suicide attacks. Egypt, by the way, did a courageous thing by getting involved here, but they have their own interests as well, because they know that suicide attacks in Israel could easily stir up the fundamentalists in Egypt too." Yechezkeli said that he detects two possibly contradicting trends in the PA public: "One is that the regular public is getting quite tired of these attacks on Israelis, in the knowledge that it does great damage to their infrastructures, and certainly doesn't help them put bread on the table... The other is the terrorists themselves, fueled by Iran and others such as Iraq, Syria, and Hizbullah, whose interest is to find those young terrorists who can keep the intifada going..."