IAEA: Iran's enriched uranium at more than 10 times the limit

UN's nuclear watchdog says that Iran's stockpile of enriched uranium stands at more than ten times the limit set down in 2015 deal.

Elad Benari, Canada ,

IAEA headquarters
IAEA headquarters
iStock

The UN's nuclear watchdog said on Friday that Iran's stockpile of enriched uranium now stands at more than ten times the limit set down in the 2015 nuclear deal with world powers, AFP reports.

The limit was set at 300 kilograms (661 pounds) of enriched uranium in a particular compound form, which is the equivalent of 202.8 kg of uranium.

Measured against the latter figure, Iran's stockpile now stands at over 2,105 kg, the report by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) said.

Meanwhile, the watchdog also said that Iran had granted its inspectors access to one of two sites where undeclared nuclear activity may have taken place in the early 2000s.

"Iran provided Agency inspectors access to the location to take environmental samples," the report seen by AFP said.

"The samples will be analyzed by laboratories that are part of the Agency's network," it added.

An inspection at the second site will take place "later in September 2020 on a date already agreed with Iran," the report said.

Last week, an agreement was reached between Iran and the IAEA to allow the agency's inspectors access to two requested locations inside Iran.

The agreement followed a recently released IAEA report in which the agency expressed "serious concern" that Iran has been blocking inspections at two sites where past nuclear activity may have occurred.

The agency has for months been pressing Tehran for information about the kind of activities being carried out at an undeclared site where the uranium particles were found.

While the IAEA has not identified the site in question, it is believed to be the Turquzabad facility which was identified by Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu during his address before the UN General Assembly in 2018 as a "secret atomic warehouse."

Iran has gradually scaled back its compliance with the 2015 deal in response to US President Donald Trump’s withdrawal from the agreement in May of 2018.

(Arutz Sheva’s North American desk is keeping you updated until the start of Shabbat in New York. The time posted automatically on all Arutz Sheva articles, however, is Israeli time.)



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