Shidduch dating: Coming to an airport terminal near you

Lawmakers are putting together a plan to allow matches to take place even as the CV-19 virus prevents foreigners from entering Israel.

Michal Levy ,

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ISTOCK

The National Security Council is in the process of formulating a plan that will allow foreign residents to access Ben Gurion Airport for the purpose of making wedding engagements without entering the country.

One of the problems resulting in the global COVID-19 crisis has been the inability of religious families from abroad to set up matches with potential marriage partners in the Holy Land. The closed-sky policy not allowing plane trips from and to Israel has prevented such potentially life-altering meetings from taking place.

United Torah Judaism MK Yisrael Eichler has been trying to come up with a creative solution for this unforeseen dilemma. The emerging solution has been to hold shidduch dating at the deserted Ben Gurion airport without the necessity for entering the country.

Eichler's office said today (Sunday) that at his request, the National Security Council will formulate a framework for allowing these types of meetings.

One match has already made in the proposed format during the first coronavirus wave. The romance began at the Bayit Lapletot orphanage for religious girls in the capital, which has continued to serve as a charitable organization even during the coronavirus crisis.

One of the organization's participants accepted a proposal to marry a young man from abroad, but when flights were shut down, the match was delayed.

In order to get the ceremony underway, negotiations were held with the heads of the new "Fattal" terminal at Ben Gurion Airport, and a resolution was reached.

The groom arrived at the airport and was transferred to the hotel lounge without passing border patrol. The soon-to-be-couple were provided special permission to enter the lounge and underwent a health inspection, with guests following Ministry of Health instructions.

The bride and groom took the traditional wedding vows, with the groom breaking a glass and drinking a "L'chaim" in the best Jewish tradition has to offer. The happy groom and his parents took the next flight with the bride expecting to shortly be reunited with her partner in life.

The entire operation couldn't have come to fruition without the fortitude of the director of the Bayiet Lapletot organization, Rabbi Chaim Elazar Rosenfeld, the couple's matchmaker Yoeli Bruin and staff of the Terminal Fattal.



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