Poll: Israelis' faith in Supreme Court aligns with political beliefs

New poll shows 70% of Likud voters, but just 14% of Labor-Gesher-Meretz voters, believe Supreme Court rulings are politically motivated.

Arutz Sheva Staff ,

Supreme Court - overstepping its authority?
Supreme Court - overstepping its authority?
Yehonatan Waltzer, TPS

A new poll published in Israel Hayom showed that Israelis' faith in the Supreme Court and assessment of the limits of its authority are aligned with their political views: Right-wing voters are more likely to see the Supreme Court's decisions as politically-motivated and overstepping the Court's authority, while left-wing voters are more likely to see the Supreme Court's decisions as professional and within the bounds of its authority.

The poll, conducted by Maagar Mochot, showed that just 15% of Likud voters believe that the Supreme Court's decisions on public matters are professional, while 70% believe its decisions are political and 15% said they do not know.

Among Blue and White voters, 71% said they believe the Supreme Court's decisions are professional, while 13% said its decisions are political and 16% said they do not know.

Fity-two percent of Joint Arab List voters said the Supreme Court's rulings are professional, while 10% said they are political and 38% said they do not know.

Among Yamina voters, 22% said the Supreme Court's rulings are professional, 58% said they are political, and 20% said they do not know.

Seventy-six percent of Labor-Gesher-Meretz voters said the Supreme Court's rulings are professional, while 14% said they are political and 10% said they do not know.

When asked if the Supreme Court has the authority to interfere in a coalition agreement, 63% of Likud voters said no, 13% said yes, and 24% said they were not sure.

Among Blue and White voters, 15% said the Supreme Court has no authority to interfere, while 68% said it does have the authority, and 17% said they do not know.

Of Joint Arab List voters, 15% said the Supreme Court does not have the authority to interfere, while 62% said it does have the authority and 23% said they were not sure.

Seventy-two percent of Yamina voters said the Supreme Court does not have the authority to interfere, while 8% said it does have the authority and 20% said they were not sure.

Among Labor-Gesher-Meretz voters, 21% said the Supreme Court does not have the authority to interfere in coalition agreements, while 61% said it does have the authority to do so, and 18% said they were not sure.



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