Poll:
Blue and White widens lead over the Likud as rightist bloc falls

Less than two-thirds of Likud voters certain they'll turn out for the party again, compared to 75% of Blue & White voters.

David Rosenberg ,

Benny Gantz and Yair Lapid
Benny Gantz and Yair Lapid
REUTERS

The Blue and White party has opened up a three-seat lead over the Likud according to a new poll, pushing the left-wing – Arab bloc into a narrow lead over the right-wing – religious bloc.

The new poll, conducted by Maagar Mohot and published by i24NEWS and Israel Hayom on Friday, showed the Blue and White party rising from 34 seats in last week’s poll and the 33 seats the party won in September to 36 seats.

The Likud also rose in the poll, but remains behind the Blue and White party with 33 seats, one more than in last week’s poll.

In total, the left-wing – Arab bloc showed a net gain of one seat since last week, rising from 56 seats to 57, while the right-wing – religious bloc fell from 57 seats to 56.

Yisrael Beytenu, which has called for a unity government, remained stable at seven seats – one less than the party won in September, 2019.

On the Left, the alliance of Labor and Meretz is projected to win eight seats, the same number as in last week’s poll but three less than the two parties currently hold.

The Joint Arab List, which won 13 seats in September, fell from 14 seats in last week’s poll to 13 seats.

Among the two haredi parties, United Torah Judaism fell by one seat since last week, from eight seats to seven, the same number the party won in September; while Shas remained stable at eight seats, one less than it won in September.

The Yamina party, a joint list of three small right-wing factions, fell in this week’s poll from nine seats to eight – one more than the party won in the last election.

Otzma Yehudit, which failed to clear the 3.25% electoral threshold in the last election, would receive 1% of the vote if new elections were held today.

The poll also found that voters who backed Labor or Meretz in the previous election were the most committed to voting for the joint Labor-Meretz list in next month’s election, with 85% certain they’d vote for the party.

More than three-quarters (78%) of Shas voters also expressed certainty they’d vote for the party again, compared to 76% of United Torah Judaism voters, 75% of Blue and White voters, and 75% of Otzma Yehudit voters.

Among Likud voters, however, just 65% said they’re certain they’d vote for the party again, compared to 63% of Yisrael Beytenu voters and 59% of Joint Arab List voters.

Yamina had the smallest number of voters certain they’d vote the party again, however, with just 50% saying they’re sure they’ll back the rightist list again.




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