Huckabee: Support for Israel is not bipartisan anymore

Former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee visits City of David, says archaeology proves truth of the Bible, US must stand with Israel.

Yoni Kempinski,

Mike Huckabee
Mike Huckabee
Yoni Kempinski

Former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee visited the City of David archaeological park in Jerusalem Wednesday. Huckabee's visit was part of a tour with New York politicians organised by Chovevei Zion together with Arutz Sheva.

"The city of David is a remarkable place, and it authenticates, archaeologically, the Biblical record," Governor Huckabee told Arutz Sheva. "One of the great things that archaeologically has done is that in all of the discoveries and excavations throughout Israel, not one time has an archaeological discovery controverted the Biblical record. I think that's a remarkable thing. When you have so many people saying the Bible is a myth, it's a story but it's not historical, and every time a spoon of dirt is turned in this city, we find out, yeah, it really did happen, and there's a historic, archaeological record to prove that it did."

"This is a real slap in the face to the people who want to claim that Jewish presence in the Holy Land is a myth, or that the Jews really don't have a connection to this land. I would say that the City of David is really the most powerful ways of screaming out the Jewish connection to this land," he added.

"The bedrock foundation of the United States is a Judeo-Christian philosophical underpinning. There's no denying that. The words of the founders made that clear," he explained. "Where did that Judeo-Christian theology and philosophy originate? Right here in Jerusalem. So for us to not have a connection here would be to deny not only Israeli history, Jewish history, it would be to deny American history as well."

Governor Huckabee also explained his statements that the right must win elections in both the United States and Israel.

"The left has embodied the notion that they can build the government, they can build a country and build a movement on 'what I think, what I feel, what I believe.' In other words, my 'think,' my 'feel,' my 'believe' becomes more important that physical fact and history. I think that's a very shoddy way to build a future. In fact, I think it's self-destructive," he said.

He said that Israel should not fear that it would be forced to make painful and irrevocable concessions under the Trump Administration's peace plan.

"I can't imagine this administration somehow thinking that it would push Israel into giving up much-needed land, not only for its population to live in, but frankly for its own security. I just don't think that is going to be on the table.

"One of the things that is very evident: the Palestinians have rejected even the most generous offers in the past. When they were offered 95% of what they were asking for they got up and walked away from the table. So I think it's pretty clear to anybody who's observed this for a long time that their goal is not to achieve something for themselves. It's to deny something for the Jews.

"I think America's position ought to be very clear: we stand with the Jewish State of Israel because they have a historic indigenous connection to the land, they have a right to a place on earth, especially given the incredible anti-Semitism that is now rampant across the world. To give them a sliver of real estate that is one six hundred and fortieth of the land that is controlled by Muslim-led countries is not too much to ask."

According to Governor Huckabee, support for Israel in the US "is not as bipartisan as it used to be, and that troubles me. I would say, in fairness, that historically the Democrats were probably more consistently pro-Israel than the Republicans were. That's changed dramatically in the last 15 years."

"When the anti-Semitic comments come from their own colleagues, they don't even push back," he said of the current Democratic leadership.




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