'Haredi couple' in Chicago exposed as Christian missionaries

The couple moved to the Jewish neighborhood of West Rogers Park a few months ago with a mission to influence Jews to adopt Christianity.

Sara Rubenstein,

Chicago
Chicago
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A married couple who recently moved to Chicago and settled in a Jewish neighborhood has been outed as Christians posing as Orthodox Jews, as reported by the COLlive website.

David and Rivkah Castello moved to the Jewish neighborhood of West Rogers Park a few months ago with a mission to influence Jews to adopt Christianity. Their dress and behavior were indistinguishable from standard Orthodox Jews, and Rivkah even babysat for the children of the community in her home. David showed up regularly in the synagogue with his black velvet kippa, beard and long peyos (sidelocks).

Recently, a Brooklyn resident visited Chicago and saw David in the synagogue. He immediately identified him since the couple had been outed in Brooklyn last year. He quickly informed others and a Chicago local, Rabbi Levi Notik, spread the word to the community.

When Notik found out about the couple's true identity, he approached them and the couple admitted that they were “on a mission to specifically live among the Frum community and actively influence others.” They also admitted that they're not Jewish.

“They believe Christianity,” Notik told COLive. “He doesn’t deny any of it, on the contrary, he insists that he is correct in his way, and has no regrets.”

Notik investigated the matter and found out that the Castello couple is affiliated with the international Christian group, Global Gates. Their vision, written on their website, is “to see gospel transformation of the world’s most unevangelized people groups who have come to global gateway cities, and through them reach their communities around the world.”

Notik also found a newsletter published by a Texan church with an article profiling the couple about their mission to infiltrate a hasidic community. The article included a list of the couple's top five goals which were: the planting of a Hasidic-friendly Congregation; a 24/7 Prayer Wall for the Hasidic Community within the next six months; Holiday Outreaches by giving out gifts with tracts; charity bags for the Sabbath; and Personal Discipleship with Hasidic believers and evangelism within the community. This endeavor will continue until every Hasidic person has a chance to hear the Gospel.




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