Cruise ship reaches Norway after dramatic rescue at stormy sea

The rescue operations were extremely risky due to the strong winds and the 26-foot waves which rocked the boat from side to side.

Sara Rubenstein,

Illustrative picture of cruise ship (archive image)
Illustrative picture of cruise ship (archive image)
Moshe Shai/Flash 90

A Norwegian cruise ship, the Viking Sky, which lost power on Saturday and was stranded at the stormy sea amidst strong winds for almost 24 hours with 1,300 passengers aboard, safely arrived at Norway's shore on Sunday afternoon. Most of the passengers are American and British tourists.

The ship's engines failed off of Norway's western coast and sent out a mayday call. Rescue teams quickly traveled to the area to evacuate the passengers and crew.

The rescue operations were extremely risky and arduous due to the strong winds and the 26-foot waves which rocked the boat from side to side. Many of the ship's windows were broken by fierce waves which allowed the freezing sea water to enter the ship.

Twenty people aboard the ship suffered injuries including broken bones, cuts and bruises, according to the Norwegian Red Cross. The injured passengers were evacuated for medical care in Norway.

“Many are also traumatized by what they have experienced, and need to be taken care of when they land,” the Red Cross said.

Three of the ship's four engines came back to life by Sunday morning and the ship slowly traveled to the port in Molde, a town in western Norway.

"We made it," passenger yelled as the ship arrived on Sunday afternoon, according to a report by Norwegian state broadcaster NRK.

"It has been a dramatic day for the passengers and rescue personnel on #VikingSky in #Hustadvika," said Norwegian Prime Minister Erna Solberg. "Thank you to the talented rescuers, volunteers and others who have made an invaluable effort in demanding conditions," Soldberg wrote on Twitter.




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