Attorney General:
'Court may end all terrorist home demolitions, don't go too far'

Attorney General hints mass terrorist home demolitions without sticking to Court limitations liable to bring about halt to all demolitions.

Mordechai Sones,

Demolition of house of terrorist who murdered Rabbi Raziel Shevach
Demolition of house of terrorist who murdered Rabbi Raziel Shevach
Photo by Nasser Ishtayeh/Flash90

First publication: Attorney General Avichai Mandelblit warns that an attempt by the government to pursue the mass demolition of terrorists' houses, without adhering to restrictions set by the Supreme Court, could lead to a halt by the Court of all demolitions.

In a letter sent to Defense Minister Avigdor Liberman by AG Avichai Mandelblit that reached Arutz Sheva, the Attorney General explains why they do not demolish the homes of terrorists who failed in their attempts to murder Israeli Jews.

Mandelblit notes at the beginning of his letter that demolishing such houses does not meet the criteria set by the Supreme Court justices in their rulings. "There are statutory constraints imposed by the various judges, according to which anyone who just tried to murder and failed - his house will only be sealed.

"The State Prosecutor's Office wanted to demolish a house of terrorists who did not succeed in killing, as in the case of Yehuda Glick," who was seriously wounded in an assassination attempt in 2014, "and there the Supreme Court ruled it possible to seal - but not destroy," the Attorney General wrote.

According to him, the court ordered to "examine the proportionality", stating it impossible to ignore the improvement in MK Glick's condition, and therefore it was necessary to make do with only sealing the terrorist's house.

Later in the letter Mandelblit expressed concern that mass terrorist home demolitions without adherence to Supreme Court limitations would bring the Court judges to a general moratorium on demolishing terrorist's homes.

"We act in accordance with the limitations set by the Supreme Court," Mandelblit said in his letter. "We don't want to destroy this tool and go a step too far in demolishing houses when there are judges in court who are reluctant. As long as we have the tool we use it according to the criteria."




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